I’m a little bit of a fanatic when it comes to drafts. (Remember the time I weather-stripped my garage doors?) Over time I’ve addressed most of the pesky cracks and crevices that invite cold air into our home. But, there was one draft that I’ve been meaning to serve an eviction notice to since the first winter we lived in our house. Today I’ll show you how to build a fireplace insert draft stopper!

build a diy fireplace insert draft stopper

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper

If you have an old wood-burning stover, or even one converted to gas logs, you likely know this old fireplace can be the source of cold air and drafts in the winter. Even with the damper closed, there is a draft that escapes into the room.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

You can’t weatherstrip the damper (that would be a fire hazard), so I solved the issue by building a rustic reclaimed wood fireplace insert to stop the draft.

How to Make a Vintage Rustic Sleigh Ride Sign | Pretty Handy Girl How cool! You can use this technique to make or transfer any sign graphic.

Want to build your own fireplace insert draft stopper? It’s not hard and you can complete it in an afternoon!

Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper Materials:

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Notes: I chose pegboard because it was slightly cheaper and weighed less than the masonite but was still rigid enough to hold the reclaimed wood. You can ask a Lowe’s employee to cut down the rigid foam insulation for you so you can fit it in your car. You can also have your pegboard cut at Lowe’s if you know your measurements upfront. I chose to use the Kreg Rip Cut because I was anxious to try it out. I liked how it worked and it was a good option if you don’t have a table saw or track saw. Finally, adding the reclaimed lumber is not necessary, I just like the look.  Another option would be to buy foam insulation and wrap it with fabric and batting and simply fit it in the fireplace opening.

Instructions:

Start by measuring your fireplace opening. (Pssst. You can see that our bricks are faux painted in this picture. Learn how I painted my fireplace back to brick without sand-blasting!)

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Check the width of the edge bumper (the one I used is 1/4 inch) and subtract that amount from three sides of the fireplace opening measurements.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Mark the cut lines on your pegboard material.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Lay the pegboard on top of the excess foam insulation and set the saw blade depth just below the pegboard.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Cut the pegboard to size. (If you don’t own a rip cut or track saw, you can make your own DIY Track Saw for your circular saw here!)

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Check the fit of the cut pegboard with the edge bumper inside the fireplace opening. The pegboard should be loose, but allow the edge bumper to compress against the sides for a snug fit.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Building the Reclaimed Lumber Frame:

Using the same dimensions as the pegboard, cut your frame pieces (miter cut the corners for a clean look). 1″ x 4″ cedar boards worked well for the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Use a Kreg Jig to make pocket holes in the corners. Clamp the corners (use a square to maintain true 90 degree angles) and drive the pocket screws into place.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

 

Cut a vertical support piece for inside the center of the frame and attach it with pocket hole joinery.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Cut your reclaimed lumber edges at 45 degree angles. Lay each piece inside the frame and use the speed square to scribe a line where you need to cut.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Dry fit each piece and continue until you’ve filled the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

When all the pieces are cut, set them in the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Time to assemble the “sandwich”. Lay something (scrap plywood, pegboard or foam insulation) on top of the reclaimed lumber design and flip it over so the backside is facing up. Use a liberal amount of construction adhesive on the back of the reclaimed lumber frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Lay the pegboard onto the reclaimed lumber and press firmly in place.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Lay the rubber edge bumper onto the side of the frame/pegboard sandwich and measure the area for the rigid foam insulation. Cut insulation to size. It should be inset on the sides and top to allow room for the bumper (as shown in the photo below.)

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Add construction glue to the pegboard. Then lay the rigid foam on top of the pegboard.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

 

Flip the frame over and double secure the frame to the pegboard with finish nails. Be sure that the air pressure is turned down so the nails don’t pierce through the back of the insulation.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Apply the double-stick tape that came with the bumper to the sides of the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Cut the foam bumper for the first side and press it onto the double-stick tape.  Cut the next side and notch out where there are any overlaps.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Firmly secure the bumper to the sides of the frame with a staple gun. This is a necessary step because with repeated removal of the insert, the bumper will eventually come off.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Feel free to add a handle or decorative pull to the front of your insert.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Press the insert into your fireplace and stop the drafts forever!

As a bonus, it also eliminates that big gaping black hole in the living room. And the insert is easily removed to enjoy a warm fire.

This Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper looks good year-round. My only regret is not making it sooner.

Pretty Handy Girl's Colorful Fall Home Tour

PHGFancySignWinter is coming, help a friend stop drafts too by pinning this image!

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Want more ways to save on energy bills and prepare for winter? Here are 21 Ways to Get Your Home Ready for Winter.

21 Tips to Get Your House Winter Ready

43 replies
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  1. tami gormady
    tami gormady says:

    Although this is a older post I had a few ideas about the insert. I have a mantle that is well caulked on the inside against the fireplace wall. I used foam board covered with fabric as well as batting that I spray glued to the foam board. I measured from the inside of the mantel, side to side and the bottom to the top inside edge as well. This worked perfect, I feel no air. I also used velcro strips to hold it in place. Its beautiful as well as decorative and Ill make another for when I tire of this one.

    Reply
  2. Mac
    Mac says:

    What could I use besides rigid insulation? My fireplace is not set in that deep. Do you know of another material I could use on the back of the pegboard to get the same result?

    Reply
  3. Angel B
    Angel B says:

    Excellent diy, and thanks for sharing. I have a similar brick-face fireplace and was about to do a similar cover using the rubber edge or bumper. Looking at your snug-fit test, I see the rubber fits very nicely on all corners but what prevents the air from seeping through the brick layers’ 1/8 inch gaps – see the left and right side of the fireplace.

    Once air is accumulated inside the fireplace, air pressure will build-up and exits out through those gaps.

    When you have a chance, please have your fireplace cover on, and then, cover the entire fireplace opening again with a 2mil plastic sheet. If there’s no air build-up between the plastic sheet and the fireplace, your fireplace cover and the edge bumpers have successfully sealed the fireplace; if there’s air build-up, air is leaking through.

    Using your ideas, I’ll just keep it simple for now 🙂

    “Another option would be to buy foam insulation and wrap it with fabric and batting and simply fit it in the fireplace opening.”

    Thanks!

    Reply
      • Angel B
        Angel B says:

        Got mine done last night and it looks nice, to my eyes : ) Yes, those 1/8-1/4″ brick gaps allowed air to pass through, but not a whole lot; it was worse without the draft stopper. But, just to keep my mind at peace, I bought a 1/4″ backing rod, cut pieces to about an inch, and pushed it through those gaps, almost invisible from a distance, and it worked perfectly. I could barely feel any draft coming through now so I’m satisfied with the project and would say about 95-98% air is contained in the fireplace.

        Again, thanks for sharing your project… it inspired me to move my lazy buns and do something useful… : )

        Thanks!

  4. BRAD BLY
    BRAD BLY says:

    Looks like an attractive solution, but I before I build it I am wondering what keeps it from falling forward or backward? Do I need to make it a tight enough fit inside the fireplace opening so that the foam bumper keeps it from moving?

    Reply
    • Brittany Bailey
      Brittany Bailey says:

      Yes, the wood insert needs to be built custom to the size of your fireplace opening. But, the rubber bumper will be very snug and since it’s foam it can compress when you insert it into the opening and then expand slightly to hold it in place.

      Reply

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  5. […] Finally, if you want an attractive reclaimed wood fireplace draft stopper, you can build your own following my tutorial here. […]

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