Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

I’ve received a few emails and comments letting me know that some of you are going to try to repair your toilets! I just wanted to say, way to go! Plus, some of you had a few questions for me as well.

Here are the questions:

1. Our 1/2 bath toilet seems to chronically clog. We use enzyme stuff to clear it but it just clogs again the next time someone does anything substantial in it. It’s annoying. Any tips?

A. Adjust the amount of water in the tank so it will give more H20 to flush (as shown at the end of Toilet Repairs Part 2). Or use a good accordian style plunger:

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

If all else fails, you may have a clog and need to snake your toilet out. I’ve seen some snakes that attach to a drill.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Just be careful you don’t scratch the bottom of your toilet bowl when snaking it.

2. What are the symptoms for needing a new fill valve? On ours, you have to push the flush handle down really hard and hold it… or it won’t flush at all on first flush sometimes. Thanks for the great tutorials!

A. It sounds like you either need a new flapper or you might try tightening the chain between the flapper and the lever rod. If you need to replace the flapper, you should probably replace the entire overflow tube/flapper assembly.

And that leads me to today’s tutorial!

How to replace the overflow tube and flapper:

In review, here is what your toilet tank parts are:

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

And here is the kit I recommend you purchase (costs about $20):

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

And here are the tools you will need:

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

  • Plumber’s Wrench (must have a wide mouth opening. The Irwin pliers shown have just enough of an opening to work)
  • Adjustable Crescent Wrench
  • Handsaw (drywall, coping or hack saw will work. Needs to cut through PVC)
  • Flat head screwdriver
  • Level
  • Scissors
  • Bucket or basin
  • Sponge
  • Rags or Towels
  • Rubber Gloves

Disclaimer: This tutorial is a general overview of replacing an overflow tube and flapper in your toilet tank. Be sure to follow the directions that come with your toilet parts as there may be changes or additional steps.

If you haven’t done so already, start by turning off the water. There should be a water shut off valve in the wall behind your toilet. Gently turn the knob clockwise to shut the valve.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Next, flush your toilet to drain the water from the tank. If your tank re-fills the water is not completely shut off.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Remove the lid to your tank. Set it in a safe place where it can’t get dropped and broken.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

If there is still a lot of water in the bottom of the tank. Lift the flapper chain to drain the tank to the top of the flapper.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Use a sponge to completely soak up all the water remaining in the tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Once the tank is completely empty we can start to remove the overflow tube and flapper. But, first you need to disconnect the water supply tube. Because TODAY we are going to take the entire tank off! Don’t be freaked out, you can do this. It is just like unscrewing the screws and removing a light switch cover (only it weighs a lot more.)

Look underneath the tank to see where the water line feeds into the tank. Using pliers, loosen and then remove the coupling nut from the supply line.

One quick note about supply lines: If your toilet has a plastic or rubber supply line, you should consider replacing it with a braided metal supply line that is less prone to breaking or leaks (in other words they can cause a major flood!) The same advice applies to the water lines under your sink and definitely your clothes washer.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Place the basin or bucket underneath the supply line and gently remove the line from the bottom of the fill valve (gray threaded stem shown below.)

 

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Detach the chain from the lever rod inside the tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Remove the rubber gasket by lifting up the sides of the flaps. If your gasket is attached a different way, don’t worry about it, just leave it attached.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Disconnect the water refill hose from the overflow tube by sliding the anchor hook up and off the overflow.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Use your flat head screwdriver to lose the bolts at the bottom of the tank (on either side of the flapper.) You may need to reach underneath and hold the nut (or wing nut) with pliers as the bolt begins to loosen.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Once the nut (or wing nut) has been removed, you can now lift the tank off the toilet (using both hands.) Ask for help if you are concerned about possibly dropping the tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

I recommend draping a towel over the toilet seat lid to rest the tank onto.

Remove the rubber gasket in the center of the underside of your tank. You may want to wear gloves (not because of germs, but because the rubber may be deteriorating and can leave black on your hands. But, come to think about it, I have two little boys and their aim isn’t exactly spot on. If you know what I mean.)

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Now you need to remove the two bolts that held the tank to the toilet base. Loosen the nut with the pliers or crescent wrench.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Remove the nut and washer.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Repeat to remove the other bolt.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Grab the pliers and loosen the large plastic hex nut that was under the gasket. Then remove the nut. (I’m very thankful that the Irwin Adjustable Hex pliers I have worked perfectly. Otherwise, I would have had to buy a pair of plumbing pliers.)

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Now you can remove the overflow tube and flapper assembly from the tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

If you are replacing all the parts in your tank at once, when the tank is empty is a great time to give it a good cleaning!

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Okay, time to put Frankenstein back together again. Grab the new overflow tube and flapper assembly from your kit. Insert the new overflow tube back into the toilet tank. Make sure it is sitting flush against the bottom of the tank (you may need to tilt the tank for it to feed all the way through.) Then set your level up to the line indicated on the fill valve. Make a mark on the overflow tube one inch lower than the mark on the fill valve..

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Cut the top of your overflow tube off using a saw. Sand any rough edges if necessary.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Re-insert the flush valve (overflow tube & flapper assembly) into the tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Thread the new hex nut onto the bottom of the overflow tube and hand tighten it.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Because I don’t possess the masculine type strength, I use my pliers to turn the hex nut another half a turn until it is snug but not tight enough to crack the tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Fit the new rubber gasket over the hex nut as shown below.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Insert two new bolts into the tank with a rubber washer just below the head of the bolt.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Thread a metal washer and a nut onto the bolts from the underside of the tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Gently tighten the nut with the crescent wrench. I can’t stress enough how important it is not to overtighten the nut. Or you will crack your toilet tank.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Repeat the same steps to insert the other bolt. The bottom of your tank should look like this:

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Carefully replace the tank back onto the toilet base. Being sure to line up the bolts with the holes on the toilet.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Set a level on top of the tank and level it.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Thread the rubber washer, metal washer and then the new wing nut onto the bottom of the bolt. Tighten the wing nuts on both sides. All the while keep an eye on the tank to make sure it stays level.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Attach the flapper chain back onto the lever rod. Make sure there is a slight amount of slack in the chain, but not too much. Trim any excess chain that hangs too close to the flapper.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper
Attach the water refill hose to the over flow tube by sliding the anchor clip back onto the overflow tube..

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Re-attach the water supply line making sure the coupling nut is nice and snug.

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Turn on the water supply to refill the tank. Test the toilet by flushing it. Make sure the flapper closes and nothing holds it open. Replace the tank lid and enjoy your fully functioning toilet!

Toilet Repairs Replacing the Overflow Tube and Flapper

Hey, thanks for sticking with me through this “ugly” but necessary tutorial series. Hopefully I haven’t scared you off (judging from the very few comments I received.) I promise I have some more “attractive” tutorials coming soon. Then you can bring back your wonderfully sweet comments.

57 replies
Newer Comments »
  1. Gayle
    Gayle says:

    How do you level the tank? Our tank keeps filling a small amount at random times when no one had been using it. What does that mean? I cleaned around the new flapper, and it’s still happening. Thanks for the great tutorials!

    Reply
  2. Andrew Parks
    Andrew Parks says:

    First of all, your tutorial is great, especially the way each part is labeled! I’ve done a similar installation on my toilets, but I used the 460/451 kit from MJSI. I didn’t need any tools to install it, though you might need pliers in order to remove the handle.
    Thanks again for sharing this tutorial!

    Reply
  3. cheryl yannello
    cheryl yannello says:

    Thank you for being so accurate with your advice and for supplying pictures. It is about time that someone has decided to help the females who are doing their own handypersons job. Thanks so much!!!

    Reply
  4. Allana
    Allana says:

    This is an awesome page! Excellent pictures and directions!

    I was thinking we couldn’t install a new flapper with our toilet because we have a really old style flapper valve where the overflow tube is actually centered in the flapper mechanism. First research gave me the impression that the overflow tube was connected to a separate hole than the flapper, but based on your pictures here, we can get a new overflow tube and flapper and install both.

    Now the hard part will be getting the old flapper mechanism out!

    Reply
  5. Ella
    Ella says:

    Brittany,
    I am a newcomer to your sight- but found it to be very informative.
    I will be replacing my toilet flush valve system this weekend, because it is needed and I now have directions on how to do it.
    Thanks Again
    Ella

    Reply
  6. Deb McCarthy
    Deb McCarthy says:

    Thanks so much for the step by step procedure and the pictures – I have not done much in the way of plumbing but think I can do it with your instructions. I am going to try to replace the guts of a toilet that has never been right for 18 years and is very close to failing completely.

    Reply
  7. Pearl
    Pearl says:

    I have a glacier bay water saving toilet with a fill valve similar to fluidmaster you use. It is very slowly filling the tank, much slower than the exact same toilet installed in another bathroom. Before messing with the fill vave, I checked the water valve underneath the tank and the pressure is good going into the tank. Then I removed the cap and unscrewed the top of the fill valve (counterclockwise), planning to flush it. However, I didn’t even need a cup because there is almost no water pressure coming from the fill valve, even with the cap off. There is just barely a trickle of water flowing from it. Something must be wrong in the fill valve tube, but with no water pressure, how do I fix it. The toilet is almost new, so I really don’t want to replace the fill valve or the toilet. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • andrew
      andrew says:

      I was unable to remove fill valve after I remove the nut at the bottom of the toilet and the plastic washer but it won’t budge I don’t understand HELP

      Reply
  8. Monique
    Monique says:

    You’re web site should be called “Amazing” Pretty Handy Girl but I guess that title would be a trifle long. Love the tutorials.

    Reply
  9. Donna
    Donna says:

    Thank u so much for this website. I just bought my first home after my husband passed. He used to do all the repairs. I was able to replace everything in both my toilets with ease. Only trouble I had was figuring out which way tightens and which way loosens. lol Both toilets needed to have taller overflow pipes so that they would flush more effectively. Second bathroom only took 1 hour. Thank you Thank you Thank you. Next I am installing a ceiling fan in bedroom. Any hints? Just kidding

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] Today we will get your feet wet (no pun intended) by replacing the handle also known as the flush lever. Then I will show you how to replace the fill valve and finally how to replace the overflow tube and flapper assembly. […]

  2. […] you won’t find today’s tutorial too difficult. And then, you will certainly be able to replace the overflow tube and flapper in my next […]

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