I’ve been dying to show you this project, but didn’t want to give away any secrets. You see, I made them for a few bloggers out there in the home décor blogland. And as luck would have it, most of these special women are here at Blissdom! As a tiny token of my appreciation for their inspirational blogs, I put together a little gift bag. Inside (among other things) was this one-of-a-kind memo pad.

With a note attached.
“My mouse is hooked on your blog!”
Get it? The notepad holder is a mousetrap and I was playing on the word, mouse (the one for your computer). Corny, I know.
So, you want one for yourself? I’m happy to share with you the tutorial.
The memo pad started life as a mousetrap (4 for $1) and a mini picture frame also $1 at the Dollar Store!

Materials:

Wooden mousetrap
Small picture frame
Cabinet Toe kick boards or other thin scrap wood (1 – 4.5″ x 4.5″, 1 – 4.5″ x 10″)
Wire
Ribbon
Notepad
Corrugated cardboard
Small 2″ x 3″ picture
E-6000 glue (optional)
Gorilla glue
Primer
Paint
Sandpaper
Needle-nosed pliers
Saw (hand saw is fine)
Drill and bit (for hole)

Start by removing the hook and trap hold parts with pliers. Then remove the bait hook.
All that will remain is the spring and snapping bar.
Cut the excess wood from your mousetrap with a handsaw.
(I used mine in a miter box for a straight cut.)
Sand down the rough edges.
You will need to cut down your scrap wood to the dimensions below.
The 4.5″ square piece is the same thickness as the mousetrap.
This insures an even surface for the memo pad to rest on.
Following the directions for the Gorilla Glue,
I wet each piece of wood and then added the glue.
Glue the 4.5″ square piece to the bottom of the larger piece of wood. Then glue the mouse trap right above the square piece. Make sure your snapping bar is facing down, as shown below.
Set a weight on top of the wood to “clamp” it while the glue dries. (About an hour or so.)
Anyone know what these hand weights are good for?
Beats me, I only use them to weigh down projects.
After the trap is dry, spray your boards with 1 or 2 coats of primer.
Then follow up with your favorite color paint.
At this point, you will want to drill a hole through the top of your board.
Take apart your picture frame and discard the backing.
Replace it with a piece of corrugated cardboard cut to size. Slide in your picture.
Carefully add a small line of E-6000 glue* to the back of the frame and glue it just above the mouse trap. If you use too much glue, it will glue the cardboard to the frame and you won’t be able to switch out your picture from time to time.
*You could use Gorilla glue for this step, but the glue expands and might glue your frame shut so you can’t change the pictures.
Create a bow with the ribbon and slide a piece of wire through the bow knot.
Secure the bow by threading both ends of the wire through the hole at the top of your mouse trap memo holder. Twist the wires together to make a loop for hanging.
Add your memo pad and you have a unique little note center.
So do you think those wonderful bloggy ladies will like it?
It isn’t too cheesy is it? (Pun definitely intended!)
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Sneak Peek at my Christmas Wreath

I am getting a lot of mileage out of my white base wreath I bought at Target several months ago. With it I’ve been able to make a Magnolia Leaf Wreath for the fall.

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I made a Feather Wreath for Thanksgiving.

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Now it was time to give the wreath an injection of Christmas spirit. I removed the feathers, but left the green nuts on it. I had a green fabric leaf wreath that I made out of some floral filler stalks. All I did was twist 4 of the stalks into a circle shape and secure with a few pieces of floral wire.

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I set my white base wreath inside the green leaf circle.

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To secure the two together, 1) I fed some of the base wreath twigs under the leaf wreath and 2) twisted them over to hug the green leaf wreath.

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That couldn’t be any easier! No glue, no mess.

I compared two different ribbons next to my wreath and ultimately chose the black and white one.

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Tied a pretty bow and stood back to admire.

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Hmmm, I like it, but it just wasn’t feeling Christmasy enough, so I quickly tucked some red floral sprigs with teeny bells on them into the wreath and gently curved them to match the shape of the wreath.

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Now that is more like it!
In less than 10 minutes I have my Christmas wreath! This base wreath has been the best $10 I’ve spent all year!

I’m going to try to use this wreath all year and will be sure to share the transformations with you.

I bought this basic white base wreath at Target a few months ago. I knew it would take me through several seasons.
Case in point, my magnolia-fied wreath from September.
Well, I stripped out all the dried magnolia leaves and was determined to give it a new look for Thanksgiving. When I think of Thanksgiving, I think of turkey! So, turkey, pheasant, and peacock feathers seemed like an ideal filler for my plain wreath. I also threw in some other feathers I had in my décor stash.
All I did was tuck some feathers into the wreath. Played with the placement of the feathers until I liked the look.
Then I added a dark teal satin ribbon.
Not bad, but not very exciting. I wanted to add some color, so I grabbed some green potpourri nuts and gave them a fresh coat of spray paint (Rustoleum Apple Green) to freshen them up.
Then, I put a small dollop of hot glue on the backs and pressed them onto my wreath. My goal is to continue to re-use the wreath, so I used the glue sparingly.
Now, that looks much better.
Then I hung my feather wreath up and my door is festively decorated for Thanksgiving.
After Thanksgiving, I’ll be haulin’ down the Christmas decorations. I’m trying so hard to keep the kids from dictating our decorating with inflatable santas, elves and more. Personally, I prefer the classic white lights, some greenery and a red bow to top it off.