Have the kids taken over your kitchen table or island? Need somewhere to let the kids get creative? Today I am going to show you how to make a simple DIY kid’s craft table (or desk). Let’s get building.

Build a DIY Kid's Craft Table

DIY Kid’s Desk and Craft Table

If your children are going to be home this fall for distance learning or you just want a spot they can call their own, then it is time to get a space ready for them!! This DIY Kid’s Craft Table is the perfect size for whatever your child will need and it is small enough to fit in a spare corner in your home. Let’s make it!

I made this particular table for a client and it measures 30”h x 43”w x 23”d but you can modify these measurements to fit your needs. Of course, the quality of lumber you use is your choice but I used clear pine from my local big box store because it paints better than using common pine boards. It may be more expensive but the boards tend to be straighter, it saves time on sanding, and I feel it yields a better-finished product. It doesn’t matter what wood you use as long as you love it.

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Tools:

Cut list and pocket-hole placement:

  • 4- 2×2 @ 29 ¼”
  • 2- 1×4 @ 38” (3 pocket-holes in each end)
  • 2- 1×4 @ 18” (2 pocket-holes in each end)
  • 1- 1×4 @ 19” (2 pocket-holes in each end)
  • 3/4”x 43”x 23” birch plywood

Step 1: Sand table components

  • I know it seems odd to start with this step but trust me when I tell you it is much easier to sand these boards before they are in place. Depending on how rough your lumber is, begin using 60-80 grit sandpaper and incrementally work your way up to 220 grit sandpaper.  I chose to use clear pine found at my local big box store so I was able to start with 120 grit sandpaper, which cut down my sanding time. This makes the extra money spent, well worth it!

Step 2: Assemble both table sides

  • Sandwich one 1 x 4 x 18” (apron) board between two 2 x 2 x 29 ¼” (leg) boards. Pocket-holes should be facing up.
  • To add a little detail, place a ¼” piece of scrap beneath the 1×4 board to inset it slightly. This will create a shallow reveal looks nice and also gives you a little grace because now the three boards don’t have to be flush to the same surface perfectly.
  • Clamp the legs and apron boards together and join them using wood glue and 1 ¼” pocket screws.
  • Repeat these steps for the other side of the table.

Step 3: Attach the front and back table aprons

  • With both side components standing on their sides sandwich a 1 x 4 x 38” (apron) board between them, again placing a ¼” board beneath the apron to inset it slightly.
  • Align the top of the 1×4 with the top of the side components.
  • Clamp and attach using wood glue and 1 ¼” pocket screws.
  • Carefully flip the piece over and repeat the above steps to attach the second 1 x 4 x 38” apron board.

Step 4: Attach center support

  • Attach the center support using wood glue and pocket screws between the two 1 x 4 x 38” boards centered in the middle.

Step 5: Clean up

  • With a putty knife or chisel gently remove any glue squeeze out and sand smooth.

Step 6: Edge banding

  • Once the plywood top is cut to size you will need to edge band to cover up the unsightly edges. I won’t go over all of the steps here but if you are new to edge banding please check out this tutorial on How to Finish Raw Plywood Edges.

 

Step 7: Finish

  • Time to paint or stain and topcoat!! My client wanted this piece painted white, so I chose a premium latex paint and used a water-based topcoat to protect the paint and prevent yellowing of the finish in the future.

Step 8: Attach the top

  • Place the tabletop on a flat surface (bottom side up) and center the base over the top upside down.
  • This plan allows for a 1” overhang of the top on all sides of the table base.
  • Using the pocket-holes that are shown in the diagrams below, attach the top with 1 ¼” pocket screws.

    • Note: Normally I would not recommend attaching a tabletop using pocket screws IF that top were made of solid wood because of wood’s tendency to expand and contract. However, this top is made of plywood and the amount of expansion and contraction that will happen over time is negligible and should not affect the structure of the table base.  If you are uncomfortable using pocket-holes to attach the top then feel free to attach it in some other way, such as with figure-8 fasteners or Z-clips.

Flip it over and admire your handy work!! Isn’t this DIY Kid’s Craft Table adorable?!

Check out my latest blog post about building a DIY Folding Craft/Sewing Table! This table is large enough for any craft project but folds down when you don’t need it. Perfect for anyone with a small space but large crafting ambitions!

Hi! I’m Kristen, from In Her Garage, and I am a self-taught woodworker and DIY fanatic from Minnesota where I live with my husband and our two daughters. Between being a wife, mom, and registered nurse, I try to make as much time for DIY as possible. My love for building came after our family built our current home in 2015. After we moved in, we needed furniture, and instead of spending massive amounts of money to order the items we wanted I decided that I would build them myself. I started with a buffet table plan from the fabulous Ana-white and quickly set out to remodel my entire home office.

Since then I have started a side business building furniture for the people in my community. I love hearing my clients talk about the pieces they wish they had whether it be a rustic buffet table, a one drawer side table, or a toy box and then making it a reality for them. While starting my small business it made perfect sense that I would document my building journey so I simultaneously launched the In Her Garage blog and I love sharing my plans, tips, and tricks.

 

I am so glad that you found me here and please feel free to connect with me on PinterestInstagram, and Facebook to see what I am working on right now.

 

If you enjoyed this tutorial and are looking for other cute ideas for kid’s desk or craft table check out these two fun projects. Both of these could be great projects you could do with the kids to keep the fun going.

Creative Block Desk & Art Utensil Holder

create_art_block_holders_sm

Creating a Chalkboard Desktop.

How to Make a Chalkboard Surface Desk | Pretty Handy Girl

How to Make a DIY Half Lap Joint using Miter Saw

Want to add another joint to your woodworking skillset? Today I’ll show you how to create a simple DIY half-lap joint with your miter saw.

Half-Lap Joint with your Miter Saw

Hi! It’s Kristen from In Her Garage and I am going to teach you an easy way to create a half-lap joint to add to your DIY skill set. The half-lap joint is versatile and super strong.

Wondering what a half-lap joint even is? Put simply, a half-lap joint is a joint between two boards that are halved together so that a flush surface results. Check out the pictures below for two popular ways half-lap joints are used. Best of all this joint only requires wood glue to hold it together.

   

I have used this style of joint when a butt joint or pocket-hole joint isn’t possible. It’s helpful to use when working with thinner material or in tight spaces. Let’s learn how to make a half-lap joint!

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Tools:

Instructions:

Step 1: Mark your boards

  • Place your boards over one another in the orientation they will be joined.
  • Mark out the width of the overlap on each board.

   

Step 2: Set up your miter saw

  • Place a sacrificial board against the miter saw fence, with the face flat (as seen in the video below).  This board should be flat and square. You will need this because you are not cutting through the board to be used in your project and thus the miter saw will not cut the back portion of the board you are cutting. The scrap piece will push your board out so that the miter saw will cut halfway down from the front to the back. If you do a test cut without the scrap board you’ll see what I mean.
  • Next, use your saw’s depth stop control and adjust the depth to cut approximately halfway down into the first board to be cut. Use a scrap piece of wood for this step to make sure you have the depth you want before using the board that will be used in your project.
  • Adjust the miter angle at this time as well if you are not planning to cut at 90 degrees.

Step 3: Cut the first board

  • With your depth set and scrap board in place make your first cut into your board. Make sure you are minding which side of the marked lines your blade needs to cut!
  • After the first cut move the board slightly (about 1/8”) and create another cut right next to the first.
  • Continue moving and cutting until you have created all the cuts needed between the two width lines you marked out previously.
  • Dry fit the second board into the first to make sure the width is correct and make any necessary adjustments.
  • Use sandpaper to smooth out any ridges left from the saw.

Step 4: Cut the second board

  • If you cut exactly halfway through the first board then you will not have to do any adjustments for this step and you can cut the second board exactly as you cut the first.
  • But, if you are like me you didn’t cut the first board perfectly and the depth will need to be adjusted slightly for the second board. This is simple.
  • The cut for the second board will need to be the depth of what you DIDN’T cut from the first board. Use a piece of scrap to fine-tune this depth before cutting the board you will use.
  • Now that the depth has been set for the second board you can cut the half-lap into the board just like you did for the first. Again, being mindful of which side of the lines your blade is cutting.
  • Dry fit the two boards together to be sure you have a snug fit and the boards create a flat surface.

Step 5: Glue together

  • Apply glue to both lap joints in each board and fit them together.
  • Apply downward pressure to the joint and allow the glue to dry.

There you have it!! You have expanded your talents and created a very strong half-lap joint for your next project. Nice work!

Pin this graphic for future reference:

How to Make a DIY Half Lap Joint using Miter Saw

New to using the miter saw or need a refresher? Check out the Pretty Handy Girl’s How to Use a Miter Saw tutorial to get you all caught up!

Hi! I’m Kristen, from In Her Garage, and I am a self-taught woodworker and DIY fanatic from Minnesota where I live with my husband and our two daughters. Between being a wife, mom, and registered nurse, I try to make as much time for DIY as possible. My love for building came after our family built our current home in 2015. After we moved in, we needed furniture, and instead of spending massive amounts of money to order the items we wanted I decided that I would build them myself. I started with a buffet table plan from the fabulous Ana-white and quickly set out to remodel my entire home office.

Since then I have started a side business building furniture for the people in my community. I love hearing my clients talk about the pieces they wish they had whether it be a rustic buffet table, a one drawer side table, or a toy box and then making it a reality for them. While starting my small business it made perfect sense that I would document my building journey so I simultaneously launched the In Her Garage blog and I love sharing my plans, tips, and tricks.

I am so glad that you found me here and please feel free to connect with me on PinterestInstagram, and Facebook to see what I am working on right now.

Check out my latest blog post about building a DIY Folding Craft/Sewing Table! This table is large enough for any craft project but folds down when you don’t need it. Perfect for anyone with a small space but large crafting ambitions!

diy beverage center housing mini fridge

It’s 5 o’clock somewhere! Whether it’s 5 am or 5 pm this DIY Beverage Center will hold whatever it is that gets you going in the morning and winds you down in the evening.

DIY Beverage Center

DIY Beverage Center

Hi there! This is Kristen from In Her Garage and I am going to teach you how to build a DIY beverage center for your home. I have built a couple of these and each client who received this beverage center loves to tell me how appreciative they are to have a separate space to hold their coffee supplies and adult beverages. Plus, a beverage center freed up space needed in their kitchen refrigerator.

This beverage center measures approximately 40”h x 38 ½”w x 24 ½”d and I built it to house the Whirlpool JC 103EZY Mini-fridge that a client had purchased. Feel free to modify the dimensions for the mini-fridge of your choice, just keep in mind there should be an allowance on the sides and top for proper airflow around the fridge (usually specified in the owner’s manual). This particular mini-fridge requires 2” on both sides and top.

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Tools:

Board Cuts:

  • 2- 2×3 @ 36″
  • 3- 2×3 @ 20¼”
  • 2- 1×2 @ 39 ¼”
  • 1- 1×2 @ 34 ¼”
  • 1- 1×2 @ 34 ½”
  • 1- 1×4 @ 34 ½”
  • 2- 1×2 @ 23″ – drill two pocket hole’s in both ends
  • 2- 1×2 @ 12 ¼” – drill two pocket hole’s in both ends

Cut list and corresponding pocket-hole placement:

To make plywood cuts easier while using a circular saw please check out my tutorial for creating your own DIY Track Saw Jig for your circular saw. It will make cutting plywood simple and foolproof!

Instructions:

Step 1: Create the beverage center base

  • First, build a base frame using the cut 2×3 studs, wood glue, and 2 ½” wood screws. Pre-drill your holes to prevent splitting.

  • Next, Secure the bottom plywood panel on top of the base frame and secure it with wood glue and brad nails

Step 2: Attach beverage center sides

  • On a flat surface, stand both sides on their backs with the pocket-holes pointing to the ceiling.
  • Apply glue to the sides of the beverage center base and stand it on its back.
  • Sandwich the base between the two sides aligning the bottoms and fronts of the sides and base.  If you have clamps use them to squeeze the sides to the base or have someone help hold them in place until they are secured.
  • Now pre-drill three holes in each side, drilling from the inside of the base frame 2×3 out into the sides, and attach using 2″ screws.
  • Stand the piece up

Step 3: Attach center divider

  • Grab both 1 x 2 x 23″ support boards and use those as spacers for the center divider.
  • Place a small bead of glue along the bottom of the center divider panel (the short edge with pocket-holes) and place it over the base spaced by the 1×2 boards. Be sure that the long edge with the pocket-holes is facing the front just like the pocket-holes on the sides.
  • Attach the center divider with 1 ¼” Kreg pocket screws

Step 4: Attach the top spacer supports

  • Using the same two 1 x 2 x 23″ support boards you used to space the center divider and 1 ¼” pocket screws, attach the boards to the front and back of the side and center divider at the top of the panels to create even spacing.
  • Repeat with the 1 x 2 x 12 ¼” boards spacing between the center divider and the opposite side.

Step 5: Build the Face Frame

  • If you haven’t cut the boards for the face frame yet do that now according to the cut list or the diagram below.
  • Refer to the diagram below for pocket-hole placement.
  • Use wood glue and 1 ¼” pocket screws to attach the face frame pieces as depicted.

Step 6: Attach the face frame to the beverage center box and plug pocket-holes

  • Attach using wood glue and 1 ¼” pocket screws aligning the sides, top, and bottom. You can either lay the carcass on its back or clamp the face frame to the carcass while it is standing up.
  • If you choose to plug the pocket-holes do that now. You will only need to plug the pocket-holes in the refrigerator compartment of the beverage center because the other pocket-holes won’t be visible within the drawer compartment.

Step 7: Attach drawer slides

  • I used eight 1 x 2 x 23” strips of plywood to create runners to attach the drawer slides to.  To evenly space each runner vertically I use a couple of pieces of scrap cut to the same height. When the runner is spaced and level, attach it using glue and brad nails.
  • Now attach your drawer slides to these runners keeping the front of the drawer slide just behind the face frame.
  • This step can be done in a couple of ways and most people have their preference for installing drawers and drawer slides but this is my method.

Step 8: Build the drawer boxes and apply drawer slides

  • There are several different ways to build drawer boxes and you will need to decide on dimensions based on the drawer slides that you’ve chosen to use. I have provided a diagram for a simple method of building drawer boxes. (Or you can follow this tutorial for building drawers.)

  • If you choose to add edge banding to the top edge of your drawer boxes I recommend doing this after the box components are cut but before assembly to make the process easier.  New to edge banding? Pop over to see a tutorial on finishing raw plywood edges.
  • After the drawer boxes are built apply the drawer slides to the boxes and slide into place to check for fit. Make any necessary adjustments to make sure the drawer boxes are level and flush to the back of the face frame. You’ll want to make those adjustments now because it can be very difficult to do after the drawer faces are attached.  I have learned this the hard way.
  • EXTRA! One great addition to the beverage center is to add a DIY Drawer in a Drawer to keep small items such as corkscrews, bottle openers, K-cups, and wine corks organized.  Check out my tutorial for how to build this because now would be the perfect time to incorporate it into the beverage center.

Step 9: Cut the drawer faces and beverage center top

  • Using the remaining plywood cut out the beverage center top,  and drawer faces. You WILL need to edge band these pieces to hide the unsightly edge!
  • Cut the top to overhang the base by 1/2″ on either side and the front.
  • The drawer faces should be cut to fit within the face frame and cover each drawer box with a 1/16″ gap around each drawer face. A tip is to use playing cards or nickels to get even spacing.

Step 10: Finishing

  • You’ve gotten as far as you possibly can without putting it all together which means it’s time to sand everything smooth and apply the finish you’ve chosen.
  • Remember, if you are staining then you should be using a pre-stain wood conditioner which will help the plywood absorb the stain evenly and prevent blotchy discolorations.
  • Apply a protective topcoat. A wipe-on polyurethane (over oil-base stain) or polycrylic (over water-based paint) is a great choice for this build.

Step 11: Attach drawer faces and drawer hardware

  • Start by removing all drawer boxes except the bottom and then work your way up.
  • Use your playing cards or nickels to help you evenly space the drawer face with the face frame, then pre-drill 2 holes from the inside of the drawer box out into the drawer face.
  • Next, use two 1 ¼” screws to attach each drawer face to the drawer box.
  • Once all drawer faces are attached, you can install your drawer pulls according to the manufacturer’s directions.
  • Finally, cut the 1/8″ backer board to size to cover the back of the drawer compartment and attach it with brad nails.

Step 12: Attach the top

  • Using the figure-eight fasteners and matching size Forstner bit attach two figure-eight fasteners to each side and the center divider. If you’re unsure how to attach figure-eight fasteners here is a quick video to help you out:

Note: This is a very heavy piece of furniture and should not be moved by lifting from the top. Always lift from the sides or bottom.

Step 13: Install the mini-fridge!

  • Once the beverage center has been carried to where it will be placed in your home slide the mini-refrigerator into place and fill it with your favorite beverages.  I already know what mine would be! 😉

diy beverage center housing mini fridge

Great job!! This is going to be such a cool piece to have in your home and you’ll enjoy the extra space in your kitchen refrigerator.

Check out my latest blog post about building a DIY Folding Craft/Sewing Table! This table is large enough for any craft project but folds down when you don’t need it. Perfect for anyone with a small space but large crafting ambitions!

Hi! I’m Kristen, from In Her Garage, and I am a self-taught woodworker and DIY fanatic from Minnesota where I live with my husband and our two daughters. Between being a wife, mom, and registered nurse, I try to make as much time for DIY as possible. My love for building came after our family built our current home in 2015. After we moved in, we needed furniture, and instead of spending massive amounts of money to order the items we wanted I decided that I would build them myself. I started with a buffet table plan from the fabulous Ana-white and quickly set out to remodel my entire home office.

Since then I have started a side business building furniture for the people in my community. I love hearing my clients talk about the pieces they wish they had whether it be a rustic buffet table, a one drawer side table, or a toy box and then making it a reality for them. While starting my small business it made perfect sense that I would document my building journey so I simultaneously launched the In Her Garage blog and I love sharing my plans, tips, and tricks.

 

I am so glad that you found me here and please feel free to connect with me on PinterestInstagram, and Facebook to see what I am working on right now.

 

diy track saw jig for circular jig

Making large and small rip cuts doesn’t have to be a difficult or calculated process.  With this inexpensive and easy to make DIY track saw jig, you will be making rip cuts quickly and easily with your circular saw!

diy track saw jigDIY Track Saw Jig for your Circular Saw

Hi! It’s Kristen, from In Her Garage, and today I am going teach you how to make a DIY Track Saw Jig for your circular saw. It’s basically a super simple circular saw cutting guide to make rip cuts much easier for you.  No more accounting for the saw’s base plate width or spending a ton of money on fancy, brand name guides. This will be an easy drop and clamp design that is foolproof! Let’s make it!

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Instructions:

1. Measurements for the track saw base panel

Create 2 lines running the length of the hardboard panel and label them “A” and “B” as indicated in the diagram below.

  • “A” measures 6″ from the edge – this measurement is approximately the width of most circular saw baseplates
  • “B” measures 12″ from the edge – this measurement is approximately the width of the entire circular saw and will be the end width of the track saw jig.

2. Cut the excess off of the base panel

Clamp a straight edge (or any straight piece of scrap board) lined up against line “B”. Set your circular saw base plate against the straight board and cut along the length of the hardboard to cut this excess off. You will use the freshly cut edge of the excess in the next step.

3. Creat the track saw cutting guide

Apply wood glue between lines A & B of the track saw base panel (as shown above.) Do not apply the glue too close to line “A” or the glue will squeeze-out in the next step. Collect the excess piece of hardboard you just cut off and align the freshly cut edge up to line “A” of the base panel.

 

Clamp and apply weight over the top of the two panels. Wait approximately 15 minutes for the glue to cure and adhere the two pieces together.

4. Cut the straight edge guide

Position your panel so the 6 inch “A”  section overhangs off the edge of your work surface (this is the edge you used to measure lines “A” and “B” from.)

Rest your circular saw’s base plate against the top glued piece using it as a straight guide.  Make sure your saw blade will avoid your work surface when cutting. Now cut along the length of your panel.

This will create an edge that is exactly the width of the inside base plate to the inside of the saw blade.

5. Cut off the excess from the back of the jig

Flip the jig over and cut off the excess material that extends beyond line “B” shown below.

Do not cut any further into the jig than line “B” because your DIY Track Saw Jig well be too narrow. You will need this extra width to clamp the jig to any material you plan to cut. If your jig is too narrow, the saw’s motor will catch on the clamps.

I’ve created a video to simplify the instructions for you:

Now you have your own DIY Track Saw Jig for your circular saw! How easy was that?

Using the jig is even easier. All you need to do is measure and mark the surface you plan to cut. Then align the edge of the track saw jig with these marks and clamp down.  You’ll have a perfectly straight guide for the circular saw to travel along.  Just be sure to take into account which side of your measurement you want the saw blade to cut on and position the jig accordingly.

 

Great Job!!! Now just store this jig in a place that is easily accessible because you will use it A LOT!!

Helpful tip from the Pretty Handy Girl: Buy a panel of foam insulation from a big box store and cut your plywood on top of it.  The foam panel provides a firm surface for the entire piece of plywood and eliminates any falls, pinches, or board balancing you may need to do.

If you enjoyed this tutorial check out my DIY Toy Chest and 1 Drawer side table.  The DIY Track Saw Jig will come in really handy for making these gorgeous pieces.

About Kristen:

Hi! I’m Kristen, from In Her Garage, and I am a self-taught woodworker and DIY fanatic from Minnesota where I live with my husband and our two daughters. Between being a wife, mom and, registered nurse, I try to make as much time for DIY as possible. My love for building came after our family built our current home in 2015. After we moved in, we needed furniture and instead of spending massive amounts of money to order the pieces we wanted I decided that I would build them myself. I started with a buffet table plan from the fabulous Ana-white and quickly set out to remodel my entire home office.

Since then I have started a side business building furniture for the people in my community. I love hearing my clients talk about the pieces they wish they had whether it be a rustic buffet table, a one drawer side table, or a toy box and then making it a reality for them. While starting my small business it made perfect sense that I would document my building journey so I simultaneously launched the In Her Garage blog and I love sharing my plans, tips and tricks.

Making something beautiful with your own two hands through a little preparation and determination is an amazing feeling and I hope to bring inspiration and know-how to those looking to tackle a big or small project.
I am so glad that you found me here and please feel free to connect with me on PinterestInstagram, Facebook, and Youtube to see what I am working on right now.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Hello readers, I’m Larissa coming to share with you a nature-inspired DIY project. Today, we’ll learn how to create a special DIY Log Bird Feeder treat for our feathered friends. The best part is that this can be a family fun activity to do AND to give as a gift for anyone who loves bird watching.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

DIY Log Bird Feeder

We are avid bird lovers in our home and were delighted when a friend of mine gave us this bird feeder made from a piece of firewood and rope. How easy is that?

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

What a delight it is to see our tree clinging birds (nuthatches, tufted titmice, and woodpeckers) come for a visit and see their excitement at the treat they’ve found, especially the birds that overwinter. Did you know that migratory birds will remember your home the next time they’re passing through and will come back again year after year if you continue to provide nourishment for them? It’s like a reunion each spring and winter. Fun!

So, let’s grab some materials and get ready to create a DIY log bird feeder!

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Picking Your Log:

We are blessed to have a fireplace, so we always have a stash of firewood on hand. For your log, you can use a downed branch or head to your own stash to grab a piece of wood.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

The tree-clingers prefer a chunky bark, but any tree variety will do.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Instructions:

Clamp your log and keep your hand clear from the drill bit. Wear appropriate eye protection.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

To start, use a 1″ spade bit to drill a hole approximately 1/2″ deep, 2 inches down from the top.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-to-build DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials.

Drill a second hole on the same face about 6″ below the first.

Roll the log a quarter turn and drill in the next face starting with the first hole about 5″ from the top and then a second hole 6″ below that one. (This does not have to be exact and gives a more rustic feel when randomly chosen.)

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Repeat those steps until you have two sets of matching faces on opposing sides.

Drill your rope hole using a 5/16″ bit. Starting on the face that has the first hole 5″ down, drill your rope hole 2″ from the top, making sure to go completely through the log.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Cut a 2′ or longer piece of rope and thread it into the hole. If you turn the rope in the direction of the braid (counter-clockwise) while inserting it, that will help the rope go through smoothly.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Once through, tie the rope ends together using a basic knot.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

On to the fun part! Birds burn a ton of protein flitting about, so they need to store up as much as they can. We prefer to use chunky peanut butter and then roll it in seeds like this.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Grab a tablespoon of peanut butter and place it in a bowl of birdseed.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

Then sprinkle the peanut butter with seed.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

After coating with the seed, press the mixture into the holes using the back of a spoon, or if you’re nutty like me (catch the pun?) it’s more fun to use your fingers.

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

The kids love this part!

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

You’re done and it’s ready to hang. Yay!

Give your feathered friends a treat from spingtime through winter. Make this easy-peasy DIY log bird feeder with one tool and a few basic materials by Prodigal Pieces for Pretty Handy Girl www.prodigalpieces.com #prodigalpieces

For a fun twist, and if you’re feeling handy, you could also add dowels for other species to be able to roost at each hole, but for this project I kept it simple.

Got questions? Please feel free to ask.

If you enjoyed this project, do pin and share!

blog signature copy

Pin this project for later!

DIY Log Bird Feeder Pin Image

 

Liked this project? Then you’ll love these birdhouses: