DIY Platform Bed

Build this simple DIY platform bed for your home!! This platform bed is a minimalist’s dream and it fits in perfectly with the new and trending BoHo decor style.

DIY Platform Bed

DIY Platform Bed

Hey everyone, this is Kristen from In Her Garage and I am going to show you how to build an adorable platform bed. This is the bed I built for my daughter in about an hour and a half.  In my home, we are once again changing my girls’ bedrooms (because why wouldn’t I take down the uber-cute loft beds I just built them back in March?! )My kiddos are lucky I’m a sucker for building furniture. Be sure to follow me on Instagram if you want to keep up with all my furniture building adventures!

Since my girls are moving into separate bedrooms we decided each would have a queen size mattress. We purchased a queen mattress without the box spring in the interest of saving money.  But, all the platform bed frames I found were either too expensive or too short. I still wanted her bed to be at a standard height so I decided to throw together this really simple platform bed.

The simplicity and natural look of the popular BoHo style pairs really nicely with the bedding for my daughter’s room. I used the more expensive pine boards from the local big box store (less knot holes and higher quality) to construct the bed legs and frame.  These boards are so pretty and I love the color so I chose not to paint, stain, or topcoat them.  This is why you won’t find a “Finish” step in this tutorial.  But, feel free to finish your bed however you like! Let’s make it!

How to Build a DIY Platform Bed

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Tools:

Cut list:

Bed legs:

  • 8 – 1″ x 4″ @ 12″
  • 4 – 2″ x 2″ @ 13 ¼”

Bed Frame:

  • 2 – 1″ x 4″ @ 60″
  • 2 – 1″ x 4″ @ 80″
  • 2 – 1″ x 2″ @ 75 ¼”

Slats and center support:

  • 10 – 1″x 4″ @59 7/8″
  • 1 – 2″ x 4″ @ 78 ½”
  • 3 – 2″ x 4″ @12″

Instructions:

Step 1 – Build the Platform Legs

The legs for this bed are meant to provide a base for the bed frame to rest on and attach to. Attach two  1″ x 4″ x 12″ boards at a 90 degree angle to each other with a 2″ x 2″ x 13 ¼” board glued into the center for added support as shown below.

I chose to use my table saw and cut the 1″ x 4″ x12″ boards at 45 degrees along one long edge to create a miter joint between the two boards. This creates a cleaner look but you are more than welcome to use a butt joint instead. Look at the pictures below to see the difference.

If you are also choosing to bevel the corners of the bed legs then continue reading to see how I put this joint together with ease. If not, go ahead and assemble the legs using the butt joint, wood glue, and brad nails.

Mitered Joint Leg Assembly:

After cutting all eight 1″ x 4″ x 12″ leg boards to 45 degrees, add two pieces of painters tape to the back of the board running perpendicular to the beveled edge.

Set the board down on your work surface, sticky side of the tape facing up, and place another leg board with the beveled edge touching the first board’s beveled edge, also being sure to align the top and bottom of the boards. Press down firmly so the tape sticks to both boards.

Add an even bead of glue to both beveled surfaces and then lift one board as if closing a book. The two beveled edges will meet and the tape will hold it in place.

Now place your 2″ x 2″ x 13 ¼” board in the corner of this joint using wood glue. Shoot the brad nails through the 1″ x 4″ into the 2″ x 2″ to secure in place. No need to use screws here as there is plenty of surface area for the wood glue to create a strong joint (once cured).  Congratulations, you completed one leg for the platform bed frame to rest on!

Repeat these steps for the other 3 legs. After the legs are built, use wood putty to fill in the brad holes and sand smooth.

Step 2- Building the Bed Frame Components

Let’s build the side rail supports for the bed slats to rest upon. Start by marking the center of the 1″ x 4″ x 80″ board and the center of the 1″ x 2″ x 75 ¼” board.

Lay the 75 1/4″ board along the bottom of the 80″ board and align the two center marks. Using wood glue and 1 ¼” wood screws fasten the 1″ x 2″ x 75 ¼” board to the 1″ x 4″ x 80″. Repeat for the other side rail support.

Step 3: Building the center support

The center support will run parallel to the side rails (and perpendicular to the bed slats) in the center of the bed. Therefore, it will run between the headboard and footboard of the bed frame.

Pull out your 2″ x 4″ x 78 1/2″ board (this is your center support). Now pull out the 2″ x 4″ x 12″ pieces and evenly space them under the 2 x 4 center support.  Use 2 ½” wood screws to secure the 2″ x 4″ x 12″ legs under the center support).

Note: You might notice in later pictures that my center support looks a little different than what is shown below. I accidentally cut my legs too short and had to add another 2 x 4 to the bottom of the legs to raise it to the correct height.  Oops!

Step 4: Assembly Time

Pre-drill 2 holes into each end of the 1″ x 4″ x 80″ side rails where you will attach the headboard and footboard. (If you don’t have much room to work, you can do this step shortly after building the side rails. This will make assembly easier when you’re up in a small bedroom.)

Carefully bring all of the components up to the bedroom. Don’t forget to grab your drill, 1 ¼” wood screws, and brad nailer.

Assemble the bed frame by attaching the side rails to the headboard and footboard pieces. Drive the 1 ¼” wood screws through the pre-drilled holes you made.

(Note: You may have noticed the scrap 1″ x 2″ boards attached to my headboard and footboard below. I did this extra step for my bed because I like using up all my scrap pieces as much as possible, but structurally it doesn’t really make a difference. If you do this added step be sure to allow for this additional thickness when building the center support.)

Lift the frame and place a leg into each of the four corners of the bed frame. Attach the frame to the legs using 1 ¼” wood screws. You should use 2 screws per leg (one on each side of the corner). This will secure the legs in place firmly and prevent any rotating.

Set the center support in the middle of the bed frame.

Lay your 1″ x 4″ bed slats on top of the side rail and center support. Evenly space the slats across the bed frame. Attached the slats to the center support using 2 brad nails for each. (Or to be able to disassemble the bed easier in the future, pre-drill holes through the end of each slat and into the side rail support board. Then drive a screw in to hold it in place.)

Step 5: Sanding the corners

Hand sand the bottom two corners of the frame to avoid any injuries to shins, legs, and bedding.

Step 6: Make the Bed

Lay the mattress onto the bed frame. Then make the bed and get ready to watch the new owner get a good night’s sleep.

See the “I love your whole life” sign on the wall? You can learn how I make my own signs! Click over to view my tutorial for making a DIY Quote Sign. I even have a trick for adding faux-shiplap detail.

If you’re not ready to make the bed right now, pin this image for later!

DIY Platform Bed

If you liked this build, you’ll also like Brittany’s Farmhouse Style King Bed with Storage drawers:

Modified King Size Farmhouse Bed with Storage Drawers | Pretty Handy Girl

Stay tuned as I bring you more tutorials for the furniture that I am creating for my girls’ bedrooms! The adorable side table pictured alongside the platform bed is coming next month.  Thanks for building with me.

Hi! I’m Kristen, from In Her Garage, and I am a self-taught woodworker and DIY fanatic from Minnesota where I live with my husband and our two daughters. Between being a wife, mom and, registered nurse, I try to make as much time for DIY as possible. My love for building came after our family built our current home in 2015. After we moved in, we needed furniture and instead of spending massive amounts of money to order the pieces we wanted I decided that I would build them myself. I started with a buffet table plan from the fabulous Ana-white and quickly set out to remodel my entire home office.

Since then I have started a side business building furniture for the people in my community. I love hearing my clients talk about the pieces they wish they had whether it be a rustic buffet table, a one drawer side table, or a toy box and then making it a reality for them. While starting my small business it made perfect sense that I would document my building journey so I simultaneously launched the In Her Garage blog and I love sharing my plans, tips and tricks.

Making something beautiful with your own two hands through a little preparation and determination is an amazing feeling and I hope to bring inspiration and know-how to those looking to tackle a big or small project.
I am so glad that you found me here and please feel free to connect with me on PinterestInstagram, Facebook, and Youtube to see what I am working on right now.

I’m a little bit of a fanatic when it comes to drafts. (Remember the time I weather-stripped my garage doors?) Over time I’ve addressed most of the pesky cracks and crevices that invite cold air into our home. But, there was one draft that I’ve been meaning to serve an eviction notice to since the first winter we lived in our house. Today I’ll show you how to build a fireplace insert draft stopper!

build a diy fireplace insert draft stopper

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper

If you have an old wood-burning stover, or even one converted to gas logs, you likely know this old fireplace can be the source of cold air and drafts in the winter. Even with the damper closed, there is a draft that escapes into the room.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

You can’t weatherstrip the damper (that would be a fire hazard), so I solved the issue by building a rustic reclaimed wood fireplace insert to stop the draft.

How to Make a Vintage Rustic Sleigh Ride Sign | Pretty Handy Girl How cool! You can use this technique to make or transfer any sign graphic.

Want to build your own fireplace insert draft stopper? It’s not hard and you can complete it in an afternoon!

Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper Materials:

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Notes: I chose pegboard because it was slightly cheaper and weighed less than the masonite but was still rigid enough to hold the reclaimed wood. You can ask a Lowe’s employee to cut down the rigid foam insulation for you so you can fit it in your car. You can also have your pegboard cut at Lowe’s if you know your measurements upfront. I chose to use the Kreg Rip Cut because I was anxious to try it out. I liked how it worked and it was a good option if you don’t have a table saw or track saw. Finally, adding the reclaimed lumber is not necessary, I just like the look.  Another option would be to buy foam insulation and wrap it with fabric and batting and simply fit it in the fireplace opening.

Instructions:

Start by measuring your fireplace opening. (Pssst. You can see that our bricks are faux painted in this picture. Learn how I painted my fireplace back to brick without sand-blasting!)

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Check the width of the edge bumper (the one I used is 1/4 inch) and subtract that amount from three sides of the fireplace opening measurements.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Mark the cut lines on your pegboard material.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Lay the pegboard on top of the excess foam insulation and set the saw blade depth just below the pegboard.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Cut the pegboard to size. (If you don’t own a rip cut or track saw, you can make your own DIY Track Saw for your circular saw here!)

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Check the fit of the cut pegboard with the edge bumper inside the fireplace opening. The pegboard should be loose, but allow the edge bumper to compress against the sides for a snug fit.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Building the Reclaimed Lumber Frame:

Using the same dimensions as the pegboard, cut your frame pieces (miter cut the corners for a clean look). 1″ x 4″ cedar boards worked well for the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Use a Kreg Jig to make pocket holes in the corners. Clamp the corners (use a square to maintain true 90 degree angles) and drive the pocket screws into place.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

 

Cut a vertical support piece for inside the center of the frame and attach it with pocket hole joinery.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Cut your reclaimed lumber edges at 45 degree angles. Lay each piece inside the frame and use the speed square to scribe a line where you need to cut.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Dry fit each piece and continue until you’ve filled the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

When all the pieces are cut, set them in the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Time to assemble the “sandwich”. Lay something (scrap plywood, pegboard or foam insulation) on top of the reclaimed lumber design and flip it over so the backside is facing up. Use a liberal amount of construction adhesive on the back of the reclaimed lumber frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Lay the pegboard onto the reclaimed lumber and press firmly in place.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Lay the rubber edge bumper onto the side of the frame/pegboard sandwich and measure the area for the rigid foam insulation. Cut insulation to size. It should be inset on the sides and top to allow room for the bumper (as shown in the photo below.)

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Add construction glue to the pegboard. Then lay the rigid foam on top of the pegboard.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

 

Flip the frame over and double secure the frame to the pegboard with finish nails. Be sure that the air pressure is turned down so the nails don’t pierce through the back of the insulation.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Apply the double-stick tape that came with the bumper to the sides of the frame.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Cut the foam bumper for the first side and press it onto the double-stick tape.  Cut the next side and notch out where there are any overlaps.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Firmly secure the bumper to the sides of the frame with a staple gun. This is a necessary step because with repeated removal of the insert, the bumper will eventually come off.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Feel free to add a handle or decorative pull to the front of your insert.

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Press the insert into your fireplace and stop the drafts forever!

As a bonus, it also eliminates that big gaping black hole in the living room. And the insert is easily removed to enjoy a warm fire.

This Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper looks good year-round. My only regret is not making it sooner.

Pretty Handy Girl's Colorful Fall Home Tour

PHGFancySignWinter is coming, help a friend stop drafts too by pinning this image!

Build a Fireplace Insert Draft Stopper with Reclaimed Lumber | Pretty Handy Girl

Want more ways to save on energy bills and prepare for winter? Here are 21 Ways to Get Your Home Ready for Winter.

21 Tips to Get Your House Winter Ready

Have the kids taken over your kitchen table or island? Need somewhere to let the kids get creative? Today I am going to show you how to make a simple DIY kid’s craft table (or desk). Let’s get building.

Build a DIY Kid's Craft Table

DIY Kid’s Desk and Craft Table

If your children are going to be home this fall for distance learning or you just want a spot they can call their own, then it is time to get a space ready for them!! This DIY Kid’s Craft Table is the perfect size for whatever your child will need and it is small enough to fit in a spare corner in your home. Let’s make it!

I made this particular table for a client and it measures 30”h x 43”w x 23”d but you can modify these measurements to fit your needs. Of course, the quality of lumber you use is your choice but I used clear pine from my local big box store because it paints better than using common pine boards. It may be more expensive but the boards tend to be straighter, it saves time on sanding, and I feel it yields a better-finished product. It doesn’t matter what wood you use as long as you love it.

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Tools:

Cut list and pocket-hole placement:

  • 4- 2×2 @ 29 ¼”
  • 2- 1×4 @ 38” (3 pocket-holes in each end)
  • 2- 1×4 @ 18” (2 pocket-holes in each end)
  • 1- 1×4 @ 19” (2 pocket-holes in each end)
  • 3/4”x 43”x 23” birch plywood

Step 1: Sand table components

  • I know it seems odd to start with this step but trust me when I tell you it is much easier to sand these boards before they are in place. Depending on how rough your lumber is, begin using 60-80 grit sandpaper and incrementally work your way up to 220 grit sandpaper.  I chose to use clear pine found at my local big box store so I was able to start with 120 grit sandpaper, which cut down my sanding time. This makes the extra money spent, well worth it!

Step 2: Assemble both table sides

  • Sandwich one 1 x 4 x 18” (apron) board between two 2 x 2 x 29 ¼” (leg) boards. Pocket-holes should be facing up.
  • To add a little detail, place a ¼” piece of scrap beneath the 1×4 board to inset it slightly. This will create a shallow reveal looks nice and also gives you a little grace because now the three boards don’t have to be flush to the same surface perfectly.
  • Clamp the legs and apron boards together and join them using wood glue and 1 ¼” pocket screws.
  • Repeat these steps for the other side of the table.

Step 3: Attach the front and back table aprons

  • With both side components standing on their sides sandwich a 1 x 4 x 38” (apron) board between them, again placing a ¼” board beneath the apron to inset it slightly.
  • Align the top of the 1×4 with the top of the side components.
  • Clamp and attach using wood glue and 1 ¼” pocket screws.
  • Carefully flip the piece over and repeat the above steps to attach the second 1 x 4 x 38” apron board.

Step 4: Attach center support

  • Attach the center support using wood glue and pocket screws between the two 1 x 4 x 38” boards centered in the middle.

Step 5: Clean up

  • With a putty knife or chisel gently remove any glue squeeze out and sand smooth.

Step 6: Edge banding

  • Once the plywood top is cut to size you will need to edge band to cover up the unsightly edges. I won’t go over all of the steps here but if you are new to edge banding please check out this tutorial on How to Finish Raw Plywood Edges.

 

Step 7: Finish

  • Time to paint or stain and topcoat!! My client wanted this piece painted white, so I chose a premium latex paint and used a water-based topcoat to protect the paint and prevent yellowing of the finish in the future.

Step 8: Attach the top

  • Place the tabletop on a flat surface (bottom side up) and center the base over the top upside down.
  • This plan allows for a 1” overhang of the top on all sides of the table base.
  • Using the pocket-holes that are shown in the diagrams below, attach the top with 1 ¼” pocket screws.

    • Note: Normally I would not recommend attaching a tabletop using pocket screws IF that top were made of solid wood because of wood’s tendency to expand and contract. However, this top is made of plywood and the amount of expansion and contraction that will happen over time is negligible and should not affect the structure of the table base.  If you are uncomfortable using pocket-holes to attach the top then feel free to attach it in some other way, such as with figure-8 fasteners or Z-clips.

Flip it over and admire your handy work!! Isn’t this DIY Kid’s Craft Table adorable?!

Check out my latest blog post about building a DIY Folding Craft/Sewing Table! This table is large enough for any craft project but folds down when you don’t need it. Perfect for anyone with a small space but large crafting ambitions!

Hi! I’m Kristen, from In Her Garage, and I am a self-taught woodworker and DIY fanatic from Minnesota where I live with my husband and our two daughters. Between being a wife, mom, and registered nurse, I try to make as much time for DIY as possible. My love for building came after our family built our current home in 2015. After we moved in, we needed furniture, and instead of spending massive amounts of money to order the items we wanted I decided that I would build them myself. I started with a buffet table plan from the fabulous Ana-white and quickly set out to remodel my entire home office.

Since then I have started a side business building furniture for the people in my community. I love hearing my clients talk about the pieces they wish they had whether it be a rustic buffet table, a one drawer side table, or a toy box and then making it a reality for them. While starting my small business it made perfect sense that I would document my building journey so I simultaneously launched the In Her Garage blog and I love sharing my plans, tips, and tricks.

 

I am so glad that you found me here and please feel free to connect with me on PinterestInstagram, and Facebook to see what I am working on right now.

 

If you enjoyed this tutorial and are looking for other cute ideas for kid’s desk or craft table check out these two fun projects. Both of these could be great projects you could do with the kids to keep the fun going.

Creative Block Desk & Art Utensil Holder

create_art_block_holders_sm

Creating a Chalkboard Desktop.

How to Make a Chalkboard Surface Desk | Pretty Handy Girl

How to Make a DIY Half Lap Joint using Miter Saw

Want to add another joint to your woodworking skillset? Today I’ll show you how to create a simple DIY half-lap joint with your miter saw.

Half-Lap Joint with your Miter Saw

Hi! It’s Kristen from In Her Garage and I am going to teach you an easy way to create a half-lap joint to add to your DIY skill set. The half-lap joint is versatile and super strong.

Wondering what a half-lap joint even is? Put simply, a half-lap joint is a joint between two boards that are halved together so that a flush surface results. Check out the pictures below for two popular ways half-lap joints are used. Best of all this joint only requires wood glue to hold it together.

   

I have used this style of joint when a butt joint or pocket-hole joint isn’t possible. It’s helpful to use when working with thinner material or in tight spaces. Let’s learn how to make a half-lap joint!

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Tools:

Instructions:

Step 1: Mark your boards

  • Place your boards over one another in the orientation they will be joined.
  • Mark out the width of the overlap on each board.

   

Step 2: Set up your miter saw

  • Place a sacrificial board against the miter saw fence, with the face flat (as seen in the video below).  This board should be flat and square. You will need this because you are not cutting through the board to be used in your project and thus the miter saw will not cut the back portion of the board you are cutting. The scrap piece will push your board out so that the miter saw will cut halfway down from the front to the back. If you do a test cut without the scrap board you’ll see what I mean.
  • Next, use your saw’s depth stop control and adjust the depth to cut approximately halfway down into the first board to be cut. Use a scrap piece of wood for this step to make sure you have the depth you want before using the board that will be used in your project.
  • Adjust the miter angle at this time as well if you are not planning to cut at 90 degrees.

Step 3: Cut the first board

  • With your depth set and scrap board in place make your first cut into your board. Make sure you are minding which side of the marked lines your blade needs to cut!
  • After the first cut move the board slightly (about 1/8”) and create another cut right next to the first.
  • Continue moving and cutting until you have created all the cuts needed between the two width lines you marked out previously.
  • Dry fit the second board into the first to make sure the width is correct and make any necessary adjustments.
  • Use sandpaper to smooth out any ridges left from the saw.

Step 4: Cut the second board

  • If you cut exactly halfway through the first board then you will not have to do any adjustments for this step and you can cut the second board exactly as you cut the first.
  • But, if you are like me you didn’t cut the first board perfectly and the depth will need to be adjusted slightly for the second board. This is simple.
  • The cut for the second board will need to be the depth of what you DIDN’T cut from the first board. Use a piece of scrap to fine-tune this depth before cutting the board you will use.
  • Now that the depth has been set for the second board you can cut the half-lap into the board just like you did for the first. Again, being mindful of which side of the lines your blade is cutting.
  • Dry fit the two boards together to be sure you have a snug fit and the boards create a flat surface.

Step 5: Glue together

  • Apply glue to both lap joints in each board and fit them together.
  • Apply downward pressure to the joint and allow the glue to dry.

There you have it!! You have expanded your talents and created a very strong half-lap joint for your next project. Nice work!

Pin this graphic for future reference:

How to Make a DIY Half Lap Joint using Miter Saw

New to using the miter saw or need a refresher? Check out the Pretty Handy Girl’s How to Use a Miter Saw tutorial to get you all caught up!

Hi! I’m Kristen, from In Her Garage, and I am a self-taught woodworker and DIY fanatic from Minnesota where I live with my husband and our two daughters. Between being a wife, mom, and registered nurse, I try to make as much time for DIY as possible. My love for building came after our family built our current home in 2015. After we moved in, we needed furniture, and instead of spending massive amounts of money to order the items we wanted I decided that I would build them myself. I started with a buffet table plan from the fabulous Ana-white and quickly set out to remodel my entire home office.

Since then I have started a side business building furniture for the people in my community. I love hearing my clients talk about the pieces they wish they had whether it be a rustic buffet table, a one drawer side table, or a toy box and then making it a reality for them. While starting my small business it made perfect sense that I would document my building journey so I simultaneously launched the In Her Garage blog and I love sharing my plans, tips, and tricks.

I am so glad that you found me here and please feel free to connect with me on PinterestInstagram, and Facebook to see what I am working on right now.

Check out my latest blog post about building a DIY Folding Craft/Sewing Table! This table is large enough for any craft project but folds down when you don’t need it. Perfect for anyone with a small space but large crafting ambitions!

Today I’m showing you how to add some greenery to your home in the form of these cute hand-lettered mini chalkboard planters. You can plant any type of plant you wish, but cacti and succulents would be my choice!

Hand lettered mini chalkboard planters

Hand-Lettered Mini Chalkboard Planters

Hey there, It’s Amanda from Domestically Creative back again with another simple DIY project. Today we’re making these adorable hand-lettered mini chalkboard pots! I’m including two different methods for making these planters. This project is intended for indoor use, but I’ll include steps to use (and materials) for outdoor use as well. It may seem like a silly thing to state, but chalkboard paint and chalk marker will fade, crack, and peel when exposed to the elements. You may be thinking to yourself, why even use chalkboard paint and marker, to begin with? Well, the whole point of a chalkboard is that you can change it! Let me show you how to make your own hand-lettered mini chalkboard planters.

3 hand lettered chalkboard planters with various succulents and cacti

Materials:

(I’ve included affiliate links for your convenience. I earn a small percentage from a purchase using these links. There is no additional cost to you. You can read more about affiliate links here.)

Instructions:

Step 1. Cleaning terracotta pots

Before painting each terracotta pot, it’s essential to clean them well. Just use soap and water and rinse. Let the clay pots dry completely before moving on to the next step.

freshly washed terracotta pots ready for paint

Step 2. Painting terracotta pots

Give the outside of each pot 2-3 coats of chalkboard paint, letting it dry in between coats. If the surface feels rough to the touch, lightly sand with 320 grit sandpaper in between coats. Don’t paint the inside of the pot.

chalkboard paint clay pots

Step 3. Prep the chalkboard surface

This step may not seem important, but it is! If you ever want to change up your chalkboard designs or lettering then you always want to season a new chalkboard surface before use. To do this, take a piece of chalk (using the side of the chalk), cover the entire surface in chalk.

prepping chalkboard pot surface with chalk

Wipe the chalk off with an eraser or a dry cloth. You’ll be left with a surface that looks like it’s been used! This helps prevent ghosting, which is what happens when you erase chalk or chalk marker and are left with an outline of what was there.

prepped chalkboard surface of pots

Step 4. Personalize with chalk marker

Now it’s time to have some fun! Practice your hand-lettering skills with a chalk marker and personalize the pots however you wish! These pots feature the words “grow”, “stay alive”, and “don’t succ” since I knew I’d be planting cacti and succulents.

lettering "grow" on chalkboard planter

Tips for hand lettering:

Practice on a piece of paper first to get the size and layout just right. Pick the marker up after each stroke of the letter, which is a different concept than what you learn with cursive. If desired, go back in and thicken up the downstrokes to create a brush lettered look!

If you are interested in learning more about hand-lettering, check out my blog Designs by Amanda Kay for free practice sheets and tutorials!

hand lettered pots finished

Step 5. Plant!

If you are going to be planting succulents or cacti in your mini chalkboard pots, be sure to use an appropriate potting soil! Fill about 3/4 of the way up with soil, tuck in each plant, and then fill in with soil around the roots. Water lightly and place them in a sunny area in your home.

top down view of succulent in planter on decorative plate

Using These Chalkboard Pots Outdoors?

The steps will be similar, but the products used will vary. First, you’ll want to choose an outdoor acrylic paint instead of chalkboard paint. Outdoor acrylic will hold up to weather better, and won’t fade when sealed. There will be no need to prep the surface with chalk, so just skip that step! Use an oil-based paint marker for lettering (water-based markers or chalk markers will fade in the sun or run in the rain).

One important extra step is applying a sealant. Using a polycrylic top coat will protect the paint from cracking, chipping, and fading in the sun. Keep in mind that the terracotta pots will lose their moisture-wicking capabilities when painted and sealed.

close up of stay alive planter with cactus

My mini chalkboard planters live in my office where the plants get plenty of light throughout the day! Plus they add a nice touch of greenery to my creative space.

mini chalkboard pots in craft room

What part of your home could use a set of these hand-lettered chalkboard planters?

Love this tutorial? Don’t forget to pin for later!

I’m Amanda, and I am the creator and voice behind the food and DIY blog, Domestically Creative. What started as a place to share updates with friends and family after we moved from Illinois to Tennessee and then to Texas, turned into a passion for finding creative and frugal ways to feed us and decorate our homes.

I have always had the “make it myself” attitude and I’m not afraid to bust out the power tools or get creative when it comes to decorating our home on a budget. You can usually find me scouring the local thrift stores, garage sales and estate sales looking for my next makeover (like this litter box cabinet), or dreaming up ways to make our new house feel more like home. My most recent project was giving my home office a much needed facelift. Some of the plans included creating a fun inspirational accent wall and adding pegboard to store my craft hoards.

I currently call Missouri home, where I live with my husband, dog, and 2 cats in a pretty dull, late 90’s split level. My husband and I both love to travel the U.S and recently purchased a small travel trailer to tag along in our journeys. In our free time together we can usually be found working together on a home project, exploring a new place, or just lounging with our pup, Delilah.

I’d love for you to connect with me on social media via Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter!

See all of Amanda’s tutorials HERE.