Install Security Film to a Glass Door and Protect Your Home

How to Add Security Film to Glass Doors & Windows | Pretty Handy Girl

How to Add Security Film to Glass Doors & Windows | Pretty Handy Girl

The folks at Allstate Insurance have graciously sponsored this post, which will help you learn how to install security film to safeguard your doors (or windows) from a potential break-in! It’s a simply DIY solution that could potentially save you the heartache of having your home burglarized.

I’ve noticed an unsettling trend in our area. There are more thefts popping up around our neighborhood. Luckily the majority of them are burglaries with no violence. But, it’s still unsettling. If you want the latest on crimes around you, sign up for SpotCrime.com. Simply enter your address and you’ll get emails when crimes are reported around you. Then again, this could lead to a bit of paranoia {raising hand.}

SpotCrime.com map

Regardless, there are two doors in our home that have always caused me some concern. We have two half window doors that needed some added security measures. The first one is the entrance to our mudroom. The second one is the back door to our garage (and you know I’d be heartbroken if anyone stole my power tools!)

How to Add Security Film to Glass Doors & Windows | Pretty Handy Girl

If you have a door like this, a burglar can simply break the pane of glass closest to the knob, reach in and turn the deadbolt and handle. One option is to install a two-sided keyed entry deadbolt lock. Because we have little children, I worried about them not being able to find the key and get out of the house in the event of a fire.

How to Add Security Film to Glass Doors &  Windows | Pretty Handy Girl

This past week I happened to hear about security film and did a little research. I was skeptical until I tested the material myself. The results seriously amazed me! You can watch my test in the video later in this post.

In the meantime, here are the supplies you’ll need and the very simply installation instructions!

Materials:
(contains Amazon Affiliate Links)
  • 8 Mil Security Window Film
  • Spray bottle with water and a few drops of dish soap (or baby shampoo)
  • 4 inch Squeegee
  • Paper towels
  • Razor blade
  • X-acto knife (or scissors)
  • Metal Ruler
  • Ball point pen or fine-tipped sharpie
  • Cutting surface

 Instructions:

1. Begin by removing the grill if you have one solid piece of glass with faux dividers (see my video below for more details on removing the grill.) If you have true divided light, move on to the next step.

2. Measure your windows. Reduce the size by 1/8″ to leave space at the edges for the water to escape. Transfer the measurements onto the film with pen. Cut the window film with the x-acto knife and ruler. (You could use scissors in a pinch.)

How to Add Security Film to Glass Doors &  Windows | Pretty Handy Girl [Read more...]

Painted Lampshade and a Quick Guest Room Makeover {Lowe’s Creator}

GuestBed

Painted Lampshade & a Quick Guest Room Makeover | Pretty Handy Girl

My mom was coming to visit his month. Since she’s a repeat guest, I wanted to give the guest room a little mini makeover for her. With the addition of some new pillows, curtains and a painted lampshade I gave it a new look in an afternoon.

Here’s the before:

GuestBed

And the after: [Read more...]

How to Install Trim and Casing Moulding on a Casement Window

How to Frame and Install Window Casing and Trim by Pretty Handy Girl

How to Frame and Install Window Casing and Trim by Pretty Handy Girl

Hello Friday!!! It’s been a chaotic week here, how about yours?

I’m excited to be sharing more tutorials from the kitchen renovation. I hope you’ll excuse me as we jump back and forth in the renovation process. I’ve been trying to get the most relevant tutorials to you as soon as I can. Speaking of relevant, I understand there are a lot of under-dressed windows out there that need trim or could use a little more “WOW Factor”!  Is that your  case—ment? Hahahaha. Well, sit down for a minute and I’ll go over the details for installing window trim and casing on a casement window. Have no fear if you have a double hung window or other, these techniques will work for those windows too.

Replacement vs. New Construction Windows:

handyman_installing_window

But, let’s back up for a minute. I wanted to share with you a little snafu that happened with our casement window. When I ordered it, the guy taking the order asked me a few questions and somewhere there was a translation breakdown. He thought I needed a replacement window because I was replacing an existing window. What he didn’t realize is that I was increasing the size of the window opening and therefore needed a new construction window. In the end, I was stuck with the replacement window, but my handman and I used as many weather-stripping, caulking and water barrier techniques we could think of to keep it water tight.

This is what you need to know when ordering a new window: If you are removing the old and putting in a new window into the same frame, you order a replacement window. If you are expanding or changing the size of your window opening you need to order a new construction window.

Materials:

 

Instructions for Installing Trim, Casing and Moulding on a Window: [Read more...]

How to Install Window Blinds and Curtains {Lowe’s Creator}

lowes_white_shell_finial

Easy Window Treatment Upgrades | Pretty Handy Girl

Whoa. What happened to summer? Labor Day is here and that means the holidays are just around the corner. I’ve started to think about sprucing up our guest room in anticipation of having guests. The number one complaint our guests have (not that many of them complain) is that there is too much light that comes in the window in the morning. When Lowe’s asked us to focus on window treatments in September, I realized the time had come to address this blinding light situation. Little did I know, that installing new blinds and curtains would take less than an hour!

Here is the basic window that I started with. (Yes, there’s a roller shade there, but it was hidden under a valance and frankly it’s a pain to use.)

How to Install Window Blinds and Curtains | Pretty Handy Girl

After taking a few measurements, I headed to Lowe’s to look at the options for window blinds and curtains. It was a tough decision because I really liked some of the roman shades. But, I wanted a blind that wouldn’t block much light when it was raised. I settled on the Levolor cordless room darkening cellullar shade. Not only does it have a low profile when installed, but raising it and lowering is as easy as pressing a button. Plus, no strangulation hazards because there are no external cords! I’m kicking myself for not doing this sooner.

How to Install Window Blinds and Curtains | Pretty Handy Girl

How to Install Blinds and Curtains from Lowe’s in less than an hour: [Read more...]

Easy Sofa Makeover and Living Room Mini-Makeover

Sofa makeover1

Have you ever been bored with the way a room looks?  For me, it was my living room. It houses the same sofa… The same lamps… The same golden frames surrounding the same prints we loved so much 13 years ago! I have a quick tutorial for giving your room a mini-makeover for not a lot of cash.

living room with sofa with nailhead trim2 [Read more...]

Build Your Own Custom Kitchen Herb Planter

both ends cut at an angle

kitchen window herb garden final-title-Lg

Hello again, it’s Cristina from Remodelando la Casa.   I’m happy to share a tutorial to build this kitchen herb planter with you today. It’s one of those projects that you can decorate and customize to your own needs.

kitchen window herb garden final12

Having fresh herbs was something I really wanted to have in my kitchen and NO, I was not going to plant them outside only to forget watering them like it happened last year. They died sooner than expected and I think the lack of water plus my not so good “green thumb” were the main factors for that to happen :-(.

Having an indoor herb planter seemed like the perfect solution. Unfortunately, I couldn’t find a long planter to fit in our 5 inch deep kitchen window ledge.  So, I decided to build a custom planter to fit. [Read more...]

10 Dreamy Window Seat Inspiration Photos

BHG_window_seat

10_dreamy_window_seat_inspirations

I have a friend who is an interior design genius. She would beg to differ, but honestly she is brilliant when it comes to design decisions. This friend, (you know who you are, but if you need a hint…name starts with a “C” and rhymes with “Bear”,) was the visionary who created our kitchen floor plan for us. She was also the person who saw a window seat in our bay window. Magnifique! Adding a window seat to the bay window was a great way to free up floor space, add storage to the kitchen, and give us a cozy spot to sit and eat.

After the idea seed had been planted, I immediately scoured the web for window seat inspiration photos and these are some of my favorite (of the MANY more photos I found): [Read more...]

How to Install Window Trim

attaching apron to a window lg

How_to_install_window_trim

Hi everyone, I’m Cristina from Remodelando la Casa, and I’m beyond excited to join the team of Pretty Handy gals and guys!  I’m still pinching myself at such a wonderful opportunity.

Today I’m going to show you a fairly easy way to transform your builder grade windows from plain and boring to beautiful with loads of character and with a more finished appearance.

trimmed left window lg

Right now I’m working on updating my bedroom, where I have a couple of these windows.

small window sills lg

 They look  like they are wearing skirts, but forgot to put on the tops! :)  Yeap, naked!

plain builder's windowslg

Let’s change that by dressing up those windows! [Read more...]

10 Uses for Old Windows

10_uses_for_old_windows

10_uses_for_old_windows

Last week I replaced our kitchen window with a new casement window. It’s beautiful and I’m in love. But, I feel bad for the old window.

new_casement_window

The window is sitting neglected and abandoned beside our house. Whenever I walk by, it begs me for a transformation. I’m thinking I could make any one of these ideas with the old window! [Read more...]

Hanging Beaded Glass Flower Vases

beaded_curled_wire_hanger


Happy Independence Day America!

A few weeks ago I attended a birthday party for my niece at The Scrap Exchange in Durham. My kids had to drag me kicking and screaming out of there because I was in creative nirvana. There were all kinds of little gems of creativity. Bottlecaps, rolls of paper, extra tiles, scraps of fabric, stencils, etc. It was like being a kid in a candy store! One of the many things that caught my eye were these little glass vases. I brought a few of them to the register and the lady asked if I really only wanted three of them. Then she explained that they cost $1 each or $10 for the whole case!

So, I bought the whole case (it was a no brainer.)

But, what the heck would I do with 48 teeny glass bottles? I ended up using some to make these beauties. [Read more...]

Top 10 Cleaners that You Can Make Yourself

diy_fabric_softener_sheet_sponges

Anyone else detest cleaning their homes? {Major hand raised over here!} I don’t like to clean, but what I really dislike is paying those exorbitant prices to purchase store bought cleaners. Did you know that you can make your own cleaning products using ingredients that cost pennies compared to a bottle of cleanser!

For example, baby oil makes an excellent stainless steel sink shiner (who knew!)

[Read more...]

Adding Wallpaper for Windows to Stop the Peep Show + Giveaway

squeegee_tool_image

I’m about to share something a little embarrassing with the whole world. I confess to you that I regularly walk in my bathroom naked in front of the only window in our master bathroom!

Why would I do such a silly thing? Why? Well, I’m not intentionally trying to flash the world, that is for sure! I do it because I don’t want to cover that window that provides light and a view of our wooded backyard. I like to watch hawks, deer and other wildlife as they cross behind our yard. During the spring, summer, and fall I have plenty of privacy from the trees. BUT, in the winter that privacy is nearly nonexistent.

Now, I’m not insinuating that my neighbors are the peeping tom types, but I still feel a little self-conscious getting out of the shower at night in a brightly lit bathroom.Dear Mr. & Mrs. Jones (not their real names), if I inadvertently flashed you on one such night, I’m sorry.

When Wallpaper for Windows contacted me to ask if I wanted to try their product, I immediately said, YES! The name of their company is slightly misleading, because they sell a wide range of privacy films and decor clings for more than just your windows. You can find products in their online store for glass shower stalls, mirrors, side lights, and more.

I was instantly drawn to the decor tint line. The decor tints are sold in privacy and see-thru opaquenesses. With a variety of  11 colors to choose from, I knew I could find one to work with our blue bathroom. Ultimately I chose the sky blue see-thru film.

Why not privacy you ask? Well, here’s the thing, I didn’t want to block my view of the wildlife (and the kids playing in the yard), but I did want to keep my neighbors from thinking that I lead a wild life.

How to Install Wallpaper for Windows Window Clings

Materials:

  • Razor blade
  • Window cleaner
  • Water and soap mixed in a spray bottle (the Shaklee Basic H2 works for both cleaning and spraying)
  • Clean rag
  • Pencil
  • Ruler
  • Scissors (if you don’t have an X-ACTO knife)
  • Wallpaper for Windows film
  • Wallpaper for Windows squeegee

Difficulty: Easy to apply the film; Moderate if cutting shapes

Installing the Window Film

Step. 1 – Start by scraping any debris off your windows using the razor blade. (Confession #2 – that debris you see below is hairspray. Truth be told, I lived through the hair band 80′s and haven’t weaned myself off hairspray yet.)

Step 2. – Clean the windows thoroughly with glass cleaner and wipe dry.

Step 3. Measure each window panel. You may choose to add 1/4″ to the dimensions if you are unsure about your measuring or cutting skills.

Note: Wallpaper for Windows will cut your panels exactly to size (1 flat $6.50 fee for the all the divided lights in my window), but I chose to do it myself. It isn’t hard to cut the film, but you might want to pay to have Wallpaper for Windows cut it if you aren’t practiced at using an X-ACTO knife.

Step 4. – Transfer the measurements to the back of the window film (the white paper side.) Hold the ruler firmly on the back of the film and cut your panels.

Set the panels aside in a dry spot. Don’t let the paper backing get wet.

Wash your hands thoroughly to remove any oils or dirt. If you don’t, you could leave fingerprints or smudges between the glass and the film.

Step 5. – Wet the window with the water/soap mixture. (I used the Shaklee Basic H2 window cleaner.)

Step 6. – Peel the backing off the decor tint film.

Remember how I said not to get the backing wet, here is why:

Those little white spots of backing paper were near impossible to get off.

Step 7. – Position the window film onto your window. You can peel it off and reposition it as needed.

When the film is centered on the window, use your hand to press and smooth it onto the glass.

Step. 8 – Use the provided squeegee (also a credit card will work) to press from the center to the edges of the film. Push any air and water bubbles out to the sides.

Step 9. – Use a sharp X-ACTO blade to trim any excess film from the window.

This is how the see-thu decor tint (blue sky color) looks on the bottom half of the window. You could stop at this point and enjoy the privacy that it creates.

Here is a close up view of the blue sky tint next to the open window:

Cutting a Graphic out of the Window Film

If you’ve been reading my blog for a while, you know I’m the blogger who likes to push that “Amp Up the Creativity” button on all my projects. Which is why I wanted to cut graphic shapes out of the decor tint.

Step 1. Install the window film (see directions above). Let the window and film dry completely before moving on to the next step.

Install a fresh blade into the X-ACTO knife.

Step 2. – Use a sharp X-ACTO blade to lightly cut through the film. Use enough pressure to cut through the film but not to scratch the glass.

Step 3. – Use the X-ACTO point to pull a corner free. Peel the shape off the window.

Continue until you have completely the scene. I cut out simple graphic trees from the window film.

In the late afternoon, the sun shines through the cut-outs and projects this beautiful scene on the opposite wall.

And now I have the perfect amount of privacy and yet can still see wildlife and wild boys in the backyard.

The closer I get to the window, the more I can see out the cut outs:

However, as you can see, there is still enough of the film to protect my neighbors from seeing more than they bargained for.

Sorry the Giveaway has ended from WallpaperforWindows.com.

If the tinted decor film isn’t your style, they have a plethora of other films to choose from!

Disclosure:  I was not paid or compensated to write this post. Wallpaper for Windows sent me a complimentary sample of their product to test. This post is my idea and my thoughts on their product. I was not told what to write.

Adding Grilles to Garage Door Windows

before_and_after_single_door

You know that thing about your house that you really want to change, but it takes you a while to mull over how to change it? Well, that thing for me was our garage doors. They are the two giant doormen that greet me at least five times a day as I run errands and taxi my children to and from school. I always thought they could be a little more polished and more inviting. In this mulling over period I dreamt of painting the garage doors and boosting the character factor by adding grilles to the windows. I even created a paint preview to see what it would look like. I fell in love immediately and the hulking gray doors’ fate had been sealed.

I wasn’t exactly sure how I was going to add the grilles (cross pieces in the windows.) I thought about cutting up paint sticks or just plain strips of square dowels cut to fit, but I REALLY wanted them to look as real as possible and I liked the router profile of the real deal.

A few months later I literally almost tripped on a stack of donated window grilles at my local Habitat for Humanity ReStore. You know, the cheap ones that are pressed up against the window and always fall out. Grrrr!

That was when the “A-ha” moment happened and I figured that I could use them to dress up my garage doors. I carefully measured the panes on the garage then found a set of four grilles that would give me two cross pieces per window! Perfect! And the best part about those grilles is that they only cost $2 a piece. For $8, some paint and glue I was able to transform my garage doors from boring bland to cottage charm!

And here is the tutorial for how to add grilles to plain jane garage door windows!

Materials:

  • Reclaimed grilles from Habitat ReStore
  • Hand saw
  • Pencil
  • Tape measure
  • Paint
  • Loctite Outdoor Sealant Glue
  • Windex
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • 3M painter’s tape
  • Razor blade scraper
  • Paintable flexible caulk
  • Caulk gun
  • Wet rag
  • Gloves

Start by cutting the grilles down to size. This is how I got two crosses from each grille. First, cut the grille into two pieces as shown below:

No power tools needed. A handsaw works great.

Next, cut off the excess so you are left with two crosses that fit perfectly in the window panes of your garage door.

Test fit the cross. If your measurements are off, no worries, 1/2″ gaps can be filled with caulk.

After cutting all of the cross pieces, clean them off. Lightly sand and paint them the same color as your garage doors.

After the paint is dry, clean the glass with windex and then use rubbing alcohol to remove any dirt and debris from the glass.

Spread a bead of Loctite Outdoor Adhesive onto the backs of both the vertical and horizontal bars. Center and press the grilles onto the glass. Use painter’s tape to hold them in place.

Wait 24 hours for the glue to harden and dry. Then scrape any excess glue off the glass with a razor blade.

Time to fill in the cracks! Caulk all the seams. For the larger gaps, 1.) Apply painter’s tape on both sides of the void to 2.) keep the caulk off the window and give you a crisp, clean edge. (I’ll have a special caulk gun tutorial for you on Friday!)


3.) Remove the painter’s tape while the caulk is still wet. Let the caulk dry.


 And you’re done! How is that for adding instant character?!


I could kiss these beauties! They are definitely welcoming doormen now.

Speaking of welcome, I repainted our faded Welcome sign and hung it back up. Are you an eagle eye reader? What else changed in the pictures below? Five things have changed, can you spot them all? I’ll start you off:

      1. Painted doors
      2. Added grilles
      3. Refreshed welcome sign

Okay, one more lookey at my beautiful garage door windows and then you have to leave.

I want to give a big shout out and thank you to Waste Management and The Bagster who helped make my garage makeover a possibility. You can see more of my garage transformation here.


An Artist’s Inspiration Board from an Old Window

wpid-Photo-Jul-1-2011-1152-PM.jpg

Hey guys, today I’m dishing up a triple dose of posts for you. I’ve been busy, really busy, super busy! And you don’t know the half of it. As you are reading this, I’m on my way home from California. I flew out to surprise my little sister for her birthday. She and her husband are expecting their second child and I wanted to go all “Pretty Handy Girl” on their home ;-D.

First, you can read my tutorial for making this whimsical message center, from a curbside window, over at my friend Sandra’s blog,

Then you can come back here and read about this Artist’s Inspiration board also made from an old window.

Finally, if you like what you see you can head over to Parentables to see an entire post on curbside transformations! You won’t believe some of the before and afters!

Okay, ready? Well, let’s get this show on the road.

Materials:

  • Old divided light windows
  • Foam core
  • Tin snips
  • 3M duct tape
  • Scissors
  • Primer
  • Chalkboard paint
  • Irwin mat knife (or x-acto knife)
  • Clear Caulk (window and door sealant)
  • primer
  • fine grit sand paper
  • Two colors of paint (gold and medium gray)
  • Crackle medium
  • Polyurethane
  • Foam double stick tape
  • mirror
  • ruler
  • mirrored glass
  • tin pots, buckets or recycled cans
  • drop cloth bulletin boards from THIS post

Prepping your window:

You will need to clean, prime and paint your window before beginning this tutorial.

Here is what I did during the prep phase: Cleaned the windows (I used a bleach solution because there was mold and mildew present.) I repaired the glazing that was cracked and missing. I used paintable caulk. No need to buy glazing.

Prime the entire window, glass and all! Once the primer has dried, use the sandpaper to gently rough up the primer (especially on the glass. But, be careful not to scratch through to the glass.)

For the beautiful crackle finish on my window, I started by painting the window a metallic gold color.

When the gold had thoroughly dried, I coated the entire window with the crackle medium. Once that had dried, I painted a medium gray on top. That’s when the magic happens. The paint separates and reveals a hint of gold. It is important not to go back over the gray paint after you paint it on or you will get a gloopy mess!

I finished off the painting prep steps by applying two coats of water-based polyurethane.

Tutorial:

Measure all the individual window panes. Be sure to measure only the exposed glass.

Transfer your measurements to cut 2 squares of foam core. Make sure your blade is sharp! Dull blades will drag and tear the inner foam.

Next, transfer your measurements to cut two pieces of cork board. Cut the cork board with a ruler and mat knife.

Finally cut two pieces of mirrored glass to fit the remaining two panes (need help cutting glass? Have a professional do it, or watch Sandra’s tutorial HERE.)

You should now have 2 pieces of foam core, 2 pieces of cork board (wrapped in drop cloth as I showed you the other day), and two pieces of mirrored glass.

Dry fit all the cut squares to make sure they will fit in the window openings.

Take the foam core and tin pots outside. Spray them with primer.

When the primer has dried, spray the foam core and buckets with a few coats of chalkboard paint.

To view how to print onto painter’s drop cloth, refer to my tutorial here.

To attach the chalkboard foam core, mirrored glass, and drop cloth squares, you will need clear window and door caulk. Snip the top off at an angle. Insert a straightened coat hanger into the tip to puncture the inner lining of the caulk.

Put a fair amount of caulk onto each glass of the window. (Lazy supervisor in the background!)

Press the individual squares into it. Weight the drop cloth squares (with paint cans) while they dry.

To secure the chalkboard and mirror sections, run a bead of caulk along the edges of the boards.

Use a damp paper towel to smooth and clean up the caulk edging.

Once the caulk has dried, you can affix the tin buckets to the window. Drill holes through the bucket bracket or tin cans.

Attach a screw through the hole and screw it into the window pane.

To add a hanger to your memo center, flip the window over and measure down 3″ on both sides.

Use a drill to drive the screws into the D-ring style hangers.

I made this artist’s board to sell, but honestly I’m having a hard time parting with it. So, it may just find a home in my painting studio (aka Bonus Room). But, maybe you could convince me otherwise. How much would you pay for this one of a kind artist’s board? I keep thinking it is a real life version of Pinterest.

Don’t forget to view more of my curbside transformations.

Making Printed Drop Cloth Bulletin Boards

wpid-Photo-Jul-1-2011-1152-PM.jpg

I’m so excited to share this tutorial with you. I knew it could be done, but honestly I didn’t believe it until I tried it. When I saw THIS cute project over at Home Frosting, it got my creative wheels turning.

I asked Lesa for a few clarifications and she gave me the courage to try feeding drop cloth material through my printer. {gulp}

Printing on material is fairly easy to do if you have the right materials.

Materials:

  • Laser or ink jet printer (I only tried it on the laser printer, but it can be done on either.)
  • Reynolds Freezer Paper
  • Iron
  • Ironing board
  • Sheet of letter size paper
  • Scissors
  • 3M Duct Tape
  • Cork Board
  • Irwin mat knife
  • Painter’s drop cloth bleached and washed until soft

Start by creating your words that you want to print in Word or any other program.

Set your iron to preheat.

Tear off a sheet of Freezer paper slightly larger than letter-size paper. Cut the freezer paper down to 8.5″ x 11″.

Lay the freezer paper shiny side down on the drop cloth.

Press firmly on the paper and move the iron around constantly for about 15 seconds. Let the freezer paper cool for a minute and test to make sure it is lightly adhered to the drop cloth. If not, iron a little longer.

Now trim the edges of the drop cloth until it is the same size as the freezer paper.

Take your freezer paper/drop cloth sandwich to the printer. If you have an individual sheet feed location on the printer, it would be best to use it. But, it can be done without. Print the document you created earlier.

Oooo, sooo pretty!!! I actually ran my “sandwich” through twice to get it darker, but it was still too faint for my liking.

If you have the same issue, you can go over the letters with a ball point pen.

Peel off the freezer paper.

Now, cut your cork board. (If you are using the these cork boards in a window, be sure to pre-measure the individual window panes first.)

I have to tell you that Irwin sent me another tool to try. The mat knife. Their claims sounded outrageous, claiming it can cut better than other mat knives. “Whatever” is what I thought. But, as usual, they proved me wrong. I used the Irwin knife to cut BOTH cork board and foam core!

Have you ever cut foam core with a mat knife cleanly? Not me, until now.

I swear to you that Irwin has not paid me to say any of this. I just like their tools. I am waiting for an Irwin tool that I don’t like and then I’ll let you know what it is. But, I wouldn’t hold your breath.

Line up the drop cloth where you want it with the cork board underneath. Fold one edge of the fabric over onto the back.

Secure it with the duct tape.

Pull the opposite side of the fabric and wrap it around the back. Continue until all the sides are taped to the back of the cork board.

And there you have it! A unique personalized cork board.

Want to see how to use the drop cloth bulletin boards in this Artist’s Inspiration Board?