Warm & Cozy Chocolate Gift Basket {DIY Gift Link Party}

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I love making my own gift baskets. They cost less than a store bought version. Plus, they don’t need to be wrapped!

A pair of Goodwill pants and an ugly tin bucket get the royal treatment in this spa themed gift basket:

Lavendar Spa Gift Bucket

I seriously seek out the opportunity to make one whenever I can. Nothing is safe from a gift basket. A simple gift certificate for a round of golf? An old wire basket, come Craig’s List golf balls and—BAM—Now it’s a gift basket. [Read more...]

Making it Easier to Take Out the Trash

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I know that no one likes to take out the garbage in my house. How do I know this? I know it because we seem to be able to push our 9 gallon trash can to hold 12 gallons! Don’t do the math, it is just one of life’s unsolved mysteries.

When this mystery trashcan reaches these epic proportions, the bag of trash resists all efforts to remove it from the can. It holds tight to the can liner bringing it up with itself. I’ve only known one other thing in this world that can hold on this tight. And that would be my son at age two as he death gripped my shirt while the babysitter tried in vain to remove him.

Releasing the trash’s grip takes some practice, I use the this little dance I call the Can Can Jig. (Not to be confused with your parent’s Can-Can.)

Here is what it looks like:

One foot on the floor, the other raised over your waist height trying to keep the trash can liner from coming with the trash bag as it is extracted from the can. Yeah, I’m still working on mastering the move myself. It is not for amateurs.

Okay, all kidding aside, I found the cure for the stubborn trash bag who didn’t want to be emptied. I’d heard about this trick a few times but never tried it until now.

Materials:

  • Drill
  • Drill bit – medium size (approximately 1/4″)
  • Safety glasses

Step 1. Empty the trashcan (less you drill holes in your bag of trash. Gross!)

Step 2. Take out the plastic trashcan liner if you have one. If not, this will work just as well if you have a plastic trashcan without a bucket liner.

Step 3. Drill 3-4 holes into the bottom of the liner (or can if you don’t have a liner).

Drill the holes about 1″ above the bottom just in case you ever have any leakage (just thinking about it makes me gag.)

Step 4. Insert the can liner back into the can. Put a trash bag into the liner. Now wait for that garbage can to fill beyond capacity again.

And voila! The bag slides out easily. I almost wish I had some kind of bet with Pretty Handsome Guy to see who could extract the trash faster. You know I’d time him before drilling the holes and then unbeknownst to him I would add this quick fix and let him time me as I whipped that trash out no problem.

And now for the dramatic before and after pictures! Ooooo and ahhhhh:

Which leads me to just one question: “How will I practice the Can Can Jig now?”

Best of Pretty Handy Girl 2011

It’s the end of the year and I know y’all have been busy. So, I thought I’d give you the cliff notes version of Pretty Handy Girl in 2011.

Gift Bucket Liner from Goodwill Pants

How to Paint a Dandelion Wall Mural

Fork Photo and Note Holder

Spring Paper and Button Flowers

How to Paint Doors the Professional Way

 

How to Paint Like a Pro Series:

 

Build Your Own Ladder Display Shelves

Photography Secrets for Shooting Indoors

 

Toilet Repairs Series:

 

Dream Big Butterfly Window

Backlit Cut Out Bookcase

Rustic Wine Crate

How to Replace an Ugly Hollywood Strip Light

Board and Batter Tutorial

How to Make a Branch Towel Bar

Light Bulb Comparison

How to Install Low Voltage Landscape Lighting

Ombré Paint Chip Lampshade

 

Cabinet Door Revamped to Chalkboard Message Board

Kitchen Cabinet Turned into Shoe Storage Bench

 

Dollar Tree Placemat Garden Flag

 

Beveled Glass Light Fixture Ornaments

DIY Matchbox Car Race Track

 

And Finally, A Whole Slew of Power Tool Tutorials:

Compound Miter Saw

Jig Saw

Finish Nailer and Compressor

Cordless Drill

Circular Saw

Table Saw

Band Saw

I don’t know about you, but I’m super excited for 2012! I hope you’ll stick around for some more DIY tutorials and empowerment!

Did you have a favorite post of mine this year that I forgot to mention? Do tell! Chosing from almost 200 posts makes for some tough decisions.

Goodwill Pants Make a Cute Bucket Liner

Hidey-ho my bloggios. I’m in a giddy mood this morning. The kiddos are at the in-laws to spend a day of fun. LOVE my in-laws! So Pretty Handsome Guy and I will have our own day of fun.

Did you see that cute bucket of bath and body love above? (Who am I kidding, how could you miss that gigantic picture.) Today I’ll show you how to make the liner.

So, I started this post and wrote “How to Make a Pants Liner” in the title field until I realized that pants liner is only one letter away from panty liner. {snicker, giggle} Not good.

The liner started out in a previous life as a pair of pants:

Not my pants, I found them at Goodwill. I liked the print and had plans to use the fabric for a sweater embellishment, but then I saw how nicely the purple color looked next to my newly painted bucket and inspiration hit.

Start by turning the pants inside out.

Set the foot of the pants inside your bucket. And roll the waist outside the bucket. Move the pants up and down on the bucket until you have a snug fit.
Mark the outside edge of the pants with a disappearing fabric marker or an old sliver of soap. Make sure you allow an extra inch to roll under when you sew it.
Remove the pants from the pail, take a big breath and cut the pants. Yes, I cringe at cutting up pieces of clothing. One day I hope to overcome my phobia.

Fold over the cut edge twice and sew it.

Set the pant leg into the bucket again and roll the finished edge over the bucket until you are happy with how much cuff shows. Then use a pin to mark where the bottom of the bucket is.

Remove your pants liner {snicker, snicker, giggle. I almost said panty liner again.} And use some more pins to mark a straight line across the leg.

Take another breath and cut just below the pins on the leg. Remember to allow at least 1/2″ seam allowance.

Turn the pants inside out (right sides together) and stitch the bottom closed.

 

Slip the liner back onto your bucket…

 

…and smooth out the bottom of the liner into your bucket.

 

That’s it. You are done. Now fill up your bucket with a few of your favorite things.

The possibilities for this project are endless. How cute would a pair of old jeans look as a liner? Or some funky striped pants. So get thee to Goodwill ASAP and scour those pant racks. Size large or bigger works the best.

Oh and while you are there look for 100% wool sweaters to felt. I’ll have a tutorial for making these cute roses coming soon.

Never Die Roses

 

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